Day Eight – Final Project Proposal

Creativity in Activities of Digital Humanities

This project will propose a constructed, ideal class within a high-school setting, examining Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources and tools. Specifically, this class will also utilize creative-writing in most of the assignments for digital humanities such as a final group project.

As presented in Battershill and Ross’s academic writing on designing classroom, activities can serve as exploration but require balancing integration and flexibility. As described in their textbook, “creative exploration in classroom activities is nothing new for instructors… the digital humanities offer new compasses and maps for such exploration” (Battershill, Ross, pg. 80). I would utilize these examples of classroom activity design (such as ‘character role-play or debate’ for example) but combine elements of creative writing to see how students react and display their results and findings to the classroom.

To that end, I’ve come to the theory that activities for digital humanities can begin at the earliest stages before college by using a more common subject of humanities (or English). I’ve reached the position and idea that speculates that creative writing could be conducted through digital humanities and I would like to examine how such a relationship could benefit the classroom. If proven accurate, these modified digital activities for humanities could benefit the student’s learning of both technical and creative writing.

The methodology would be from the syllabus (or sequence of activities) planned out for this ideal class. Primarily, however, I wanted the project to focus on a final group project that would be theorized as the clearest example of my reasoning, digital activities utilizing creative writing by examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In this final group project, I would essentially have groups of three or more students work together in writing a “chapter” that would serve as a hypothetical addition to the story of Frankenstein. The assignment would require using The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein as a template to how to present another perspective of a character for example.

The sources that I’ve chosen for this thesis and proposal are deprived from studies that examine creativity (or creative writing specifically) in academics or examine creativity in part of digital humanities now. I also intend to use common sources of Frankenstein for my main focus for the students while a more recent novel reflecting on a minor character (Elizabeth Frankenstein) as a secondary source. There would be referencing studies of digital humanities within the classroom to complete my understanding and develop the thesis as well. (581)

 

Bibliography

Battershill, Claire, and Ross, Shawna. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical

Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers and Students. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Dalbello, Marija. “A Genealogy of Digital Humanities.” Journal of Documentation, vol. 67, no.

3, 2011, pp. 480-506, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/864087852?accountid=27975,doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy

mu.wrlc.org/10.1108/00220411111124550

Fan, Lai-Tze. “”Efficient” Creativity and the Residue of the Humanities.” English Studies in

Canada, vol. 40, no. 2, 2014, pp. 19-24, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1658887109?accountid=27975.

Macdonald, D.L., Scherf, Kathleen, ed. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. By Mary

Wollstonecraft Shelley. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Editions, 2012.

Mandell, Laura. “William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and

Social Media.” Studies in Romanticism, vol. 53, no. 1, 2014, pp. 133-146, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1549544530?accountid=27975

McVey, David. “Why all Writing is Creative Writing.” Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, vol. 45, no. 3, 2008, pp. 289-294, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/210673934?accountid=27975

O’Neill, ,C.E. “Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities.” Choice, vol.

54, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1633, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1915872176?accountid=27975

Roszak, Theodore. The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Bantam Books, 1996.

 

Vanderslice, Stephanie. “Beyond the Tipping Point: Creative Writing Comes of Age.” College

English, vol. 78, no. 6, 2016, pp. 602-613, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1799924542?accountid=27975

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Project Proposal

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