Day Eleven – SRC Reflection

In my presentation, I found to be more confident in myself, the proposal, and the PowerPoint in general which made the experience more relaxed and comfortable; moreover I was able to converse with the audience and their questions/suggestions more loosely yet focused than expected. I felt I had a better understanding and position in my proposal as I gauged the reactions from the audience itself as well. I also felt it was a wise decision to print handouts of the significant documents such as the grading rubric and the assignment proposal for the audience to review upon; I was worried that the PowerPoint was not large in font or overall size for the audience to read off.

I have, however, a repeating habit of stammering or prolonged usage of nonsensical wordings like “uh” or “um” to drag on sentences while in thought. I hope to fix this in the future for next presentations, a possible solution could be making more notes with detail explanations to browse back if necessary. Furthermore, I should also develop my PowerPoint to be more specific and provide more details or examples to illustrate my points; I felt myself diverging away and missed some key elements to my presentation and proposal.

As for the other presentations, they demonstrated the strong points of oral (or vocal) skills that I should strive for in my preceding presentations (formal or informal). Overall, I believe I benefited from this experience and enjoyed myself than expected.

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Day Ten – Proposal Outline

Outline of Proposal-Draft

  • The Topic (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Elaborate on thesis
    = The creativity of digital humanities
    = Propose an ideal student-activity within a high-school setting,
    = Examine Frankenstein as an English subject
    = Utilize digital sources and tools.
  • The Context (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Creativity
    = Definition
    = Dialogue-Script (as example)
    -Digital Humanities
    = Definition
    = Social Media Networks (as example)
    Frankenstein
    = Synopsis/History
    -Student-body
    = Intended Audience (The Why?)
  • The Contribution (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Digital Humanities vs Creative Writing
    = Separation
    = Integration
    – Student Engagement
    – Effect of Social Media
  • The Methods (3-4 Paragraphs Drafted)
    – Activity Paper
    – Activity Rubric
    – Demonstration/Example of Activity
  • The Sources
    – Bibliography

 

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Day Nine – Final Project Draft

The thesis for this project-proposal is to examine the creativity of digital humanities and their activities within a school setting. Do digital humanities rely on creativity as much as other English courses and if so, where is the evidence to suggest that in recent years? Why are there seemingly few sources that have the two subjects (digital humanities and creative writing or creativity) in the same source? Could creative writing benefit or negate the progress of digital humanities? This project-proposal will propose a constructed, ideal class within a high-school setting, examining Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources and tools. Specifically, this class will also utilize creative-writing in most of the assignments for digital humanities such as a group project.

As presented in Battershill and Ross’s academic writing on designing classroom, activities can serve as exploration but require balancing integration and flexibility. As described in their textbook, “creative exploration in classroom activities is nothing new for instructors… the digital humanities offer new compasses and maps for such exploration” (Battershill, Ross, pg. 80). It is essential to be flexible with teaching and learning and thus instructors must find ways to integrate digital humanities (the teaching of digital tools) into a new generation. At the same time, the instructor must find ways to allow this exploration with students and their learning by creating the opportunity to see these old classics (Frankenstein) in a present-age setting and view. I would utilize these examples of classroom activity design (such as ‘character role-play or debate’ for example) but combine elements of creative writing to see how students react and display their results and findings to the classroom. Furthermore, it would be interesting to test the capabilities of the new student body as well as their adaptability with new technology in the digital age. To that end, I’ve come to the theory that activities for digital humanities can begin at the earliest stages before college. I’ve reached the position and idea that speculates that creative writing could be conducted through digital humanities and I would like to examine how such a relationship could benefit the classroom. If proven accurate, these modified digital activities for humanities could benefit the student’s learning of both technical and creative writing.

The contribution of this proposal could provide not only insight on the integration between creative writing and digital humanities, often viewed as two different areas of skill and thought (like fiction and non-fiction) but provide a glimpse of student engagement and the effect of social media of students as well. In recent years, there has been some research suggesting that student engagement has decreased over some time; suggested by Rajaratnam’s Themes and Patterns Explored in the Decline of Student Engagement: An Exploratory Case Study. Naturally, this would be an issue for teachers and students alike in education and the retainment of learning in all levels of schools. If students are detached from their learning environment, it has negative consequences on the student’s long-term future as well as the integrity of those schools. Furthermore, teachers should be supporting students to engage with others as well as their lessons, adding to these negative effects. These teachers are supposed to be mentors as well as supporting role models to their students. Some engagement, however, should be monitored by teachers as well. If left unchecked, students could engage with one another in a manner that could be classified as bullying (cyber or in-person) which should be avoided at all cost. For these reasons, it may prove fruitful for teachers to utilize creativity and engagement in groups while undergoing digital humanities to spark interaction that is safe and positive for all. To require the students to participate in groups creates the opportunity for personal development and create relationship with other group-members. To use creativity, the students create a positive learning experience and environment, and to express themselves to the group and class in an acceptable manner. It can also provide an opportunity for students to explore story-telling (or creative writing) at an earlier age.

If accepted, this proposal would develop a full lesson-plan designed to incorporate the two subjects, digital humanities with creative writing. The thesis of the project would be based upon the idea of creating a syllabus (or rubric of activities) planned out for this ideal class in theory. For the duration of this project, however, the proposal would only examine and record the results of one of the assignments. In this case, I wanted the project to employ a group project into this ideal class, digital activities utilizing creative writing by examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In this group project, I would essentially have groups of two or three high-school students work together in writing a script of dialogue that would serve as a hypothetical addition to the story of Frankenstein; using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or other social networking program. The students would role-play through a message-board or “text-messages” between characters. The characters would be engaged in an argument over being revived from the dead. As such, Victor (or “Victoria”) Frankenstein would be essential and one of the students in the group would have to play the role. A second member of the group would play the “revived” character by Dr. Frankenstein’s hand. The third member of the group could be the supporting character that would assist the group’s argument further. Together, the group would all have to be involved in the formation of the project, argument of the characters, and presentation of their findings and perspectives. As a result, this project would utilize creative writing through the dialogue script, and the project can display basic storytelling by exploring a possible variant of the original story of Frankenstein. The assignment would require using The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein as a template to how to present another perspective of a character other than simply Victor Frankenstein or the Creature for example. This would only be one of the activities that I’d plan and observe, implemented into the syllabus to be used in a real-life high-school English class.

The sources that I’ve chosen for this thesis and proposal are deprived from studies that examine creativity (or creative writing specifically) in academics or examine creativity in part of digital humanities now. I also intend to use common sources of Frankenstein for my main focus for the students while a more recent novel reflecting on a minor character (Elizabeth Frankenstein) as a secondary source called The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. This would allow students to see how a different perspective can affect the understanding of a story as it is being told or otherwise experience from another character (other than Victor Frankenstein or the Creature). There would be referencing studies of digital humanities within the classroom to complete my understanding and develop the thesis as well. Furthermore, those sources of digital humanities in teaching would help develop the project and thus the activity itself. As expected, the activity would use social media networking sources of the student’s choice like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or others

In the next pages, this proposal will showcase the activity as well as the grading rubic for the activity as revised:

 

English 101
Mr. Faiella
ENGL Project
03/30/18

Which Character Would Dr. Frankenstein Revive Next?

Objective:
To understand Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, this assignment will require a group of two or three students to work together and role-play as Victor (or “Victoria”) Frankenstein along with any supporting characters of their choice. It is the present-age, Dr. Frankenstein has revived one of the other characters (Elizabeth, Justine, Henry, etc.) and a discussion is taking place over a social media network (Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, etc.). Consider these questions…

  • Who did you choose and why?
  • What are they saying?
  • What are their reactions?
  • What is the impact on the story?

Instructions:
Each group-member will represent a character in a public discussion over a social media network. Each group will be required to submit their scripts of dialogue to the teacher for approval, only relevant and appropriate language will be used for the project. Once approved, the group will be given until the date of presentation to revise and construct a presentation for the class. You will be graded on several different factors, provided on the grading rubric but it will be in font size of 12’ under Times New Roman of at least five (5) pages for the essay portion.

For optional extra-credit, you may provide visuals to go along with the presentation. For example, you could provide images (or “photos”) with each message or piece of dialogue to illustrate the conversation between characters with in-depth immersion into character. These extra-credits will be judged and administered by the teacher in addition to the final grade.

Schedule:

05/02 – selection of group members; followed by group discussion

05/04 – group discussion; work on script of dialogue

05/09 – submission of script to teacher prior to presentation

05/18 – presentation

05/21 – grades

Please talk to the teacher for any questions or concerns, and enjoy the activity.

 

 

Rubric and Grade Sheet

  Above Average
(25 points)
Slightly Above
(20 points)
Average
(15 points)
Slightly Below
(10 points)
Below Average
(5 – 0 points)
Character Role-Play: Taken the character’s personality completely, Taken the character’s personality with precise examination Taken the character’s personality with moderate emphasis on performance Taken the character’s personality but with little clarity and lacked conviction Taken the character’s personality with little to no understanding of the character
Effect on Frankenstein: Anticipated how the story would change completely by the character’s revival Anticipated how the strong of a change with an interesting, original theory Demonstrated how the story may change partially, taking few aspects into account Demonstrated how the story may change but lacks strong connection or reasoning Guessed little to no change to the story by the character’s revival with no evidence or reasoning
Dialogue: Exchanged with authenticity in speech while improvising present-age language Spoken with authenticity in speech but lacked some improvising or melding Exchanged between characters through lacked in smooth interaction Spoken with minor infractions in character, improperly strung together Little to no effort made into the speech between characters or not approved by teacher
Presentation Engaged with the audience, explained their group project with clarity and distinction Engaged with the audience and explained their group project but left minor details or caused errors Presented in an agreeable manner through lacked some group participation The group had trouble presentation, little to no effort in working together The group made little to no effort in presenting their project, weak communication
Essay:
(common grammar, spelling, vocabulary, page-count, etc.):
Well written, detailed. Exceed the requirements and the least amount of errors Written with strong points. Met the most requirements and a few minor errors A typical explanation. Met the average requirements and some errors Lacking in reasoning. Met the bare minimum requirements with more errors than expected Written with little to no explanation. Met the least number of requirements with numerous errors

 

Name: ________________________

Final Grade: _____ out of 125 points

Comments:

Bibliography

Battershill, Claire, and Ross, Shawna. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical

Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers and Students. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Bissonette, Melissa B. “Teaching the Monster: Frankenstein and Critical Thinking.” College

Literature, vol. 37, no. 3, 2010, pp. 106-0_9, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/742631726?accountid=27975

Dalbello, Marija. “A Genealogy of Digital Humanities.” Journal of Documentation, vol. 67, no.

3, 2011, pp. 480-506, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/864087852?accountid=27975,doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy

mu.wrlc.org/10.1108/00220411111124550

Fan, Lai-Tze. “”Efficient” Creativity and the Residue of the Humanities.” English Studies in

Canada, vol. 40, no. 2, 2014, pp. 19-24, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1658887109?accountid=27975

Freese, Stephanie F. The Relationship between Teacher Caring and Student Engagement in

Academic High School Classes, Hofstra University, Ann Arbor, 1999, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/304505672?accountid=27975

Koehler, Adam. Composition, Creative Writing Studies and the Digital Humanities. Bloomsbury

Academic, 2017.

Macdonald, D.L., Scherf, Kathleen, ed. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. By Mary

Wollstonecraft Shelley. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Editions, 2012.

Matsunaga, Bruce. Romantic Cyber-Engagement Three Digital Humanities Projects in

Romanticism, Arizona State University, Ann Arbor, 2013, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1353391389?accountid=27975

McVey, David. “Why all Writing is Creative Writing.” Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, vol. 45, no. 3, 2008, pp. 289-294, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/210673934?accountid=27975

O’Neill, ,C.E. “Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities.” Choice, vol.

54, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1633, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1915872176?accountid=27975

Rajaratnam, Ravi. Themes and Patterns Explored in the Decline of Student Engagement: An

 

Exploratory Case Study, The University of the Rockies, Ann Arbor, 2018, ProQuest,

 

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/2014465024?accountid=27975

 

Roszak, Theodore. The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Bantam Books, 1996.

 

Siemens, Raymond George, and Susan Schreibman. A Companion to Digital Literary Studies.

 

Wiley-Blackwell, 2013

 

Vanderslice, Stephanie. “Beyond the Tipping Point: Creative Writing Comes of Age.” College

English, vol. 78, no. 6, 2016, pp. 602-613, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1799924542?accountid=27975


Project Proposal – Draft

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Day Eight – Final Project Proposal

Creativity in Activities of Digital Humanities

This project will propose a constructed, ideal class within a high-school setting, examining Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources and tools. Specifically, this class will also utilize creative-writing in most of the assignments for digital humanities such as a final group project.

As presented in Battershill and Ross’s academic writing on designing classroom, activities can serve as exploration but require balancing integration and flexibility. As described in their textbook, “creative exploration in classroom activities is nothing new for instructors… the digital humanities offer new compasses and maps for such exploration” (Battershill, Ross, pg. 80). I would utilize these examples of classroom activity design (such as ‘character role-play or debate’ for example) but combine elements of creative writing to see how students react and display their results and findings to the classroom.

To that end, I’ve come to the theory that activities for digital humanities can begin at the earliest stages before college by using a more common subject of humanities (or English). I’ve reached the position and idea that speculates that creative writing could be conducted through digital humanities and I would like to examine how such a relationship could benefit the classroom. If proven accurate, these modified digital activities for humanities could benefit the student’s learning of both technical and creative writing.

The methodology would be from the syllabus (or sequence of activities) planned out for this ideal class. Primarily, however, I wanted the project to focus on a final group project that would be theorized as the clearest example of my reasoning, digital activities utilizing creative writing by examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In this final group project, I would essentially have groups of three or more students work together in writing a “chapter” that would serve as a hypothetical addition to the story of Frankenstein. The assignment would require using The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein as a template to how to present another perspective of a character for example.

The sources that I’ve chosen for this thesis and proposal are deprived from studies that examine creativity (or creative writing specifically) in academics or examine creativity in part of digital humanities now. I also intend to use common sources of Frankenstein for my main focus for the students while a more recent novel reflecting on a minor character (Elizabeth Frankenstein) as a secondary source. There would be referencing studies of digital humanities within the classroom to complete my understanding and develop the thesis as well. (581)

 

Bibliography

Battershill, Claire, and Ross, Shawna. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical

Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers and Students. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Dalbello, Marija. “A Genealogy of Digital Humanities.” Journal of Documentation, vol. 67, no.

3, 2011, pp. 480-506, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/864087852?accountid=27975,doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy

mu.wrlc.org/10.1108/00220411111124550

Fan, Lai-Tze. “”Efficient” Creativity and the Residue of the Humanities.” English Studies in

Canada, vol. 40, no. 2, 2014, pp. 19-24, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1658887109?accountid=27975.

Macdonald, D.L., Scherf, Kathleen, ed. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. By Mary

Wollstonecraft Shelley. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Editions, 2012.

Mandell, Laura. “William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and

Social Media.” Studies in Romanticism, vol. 53, no. 1, 2014, pp. 133-146, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1549544530?accountid=27975

McVey, David. “Why all Writing is Creative Writing.” Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, vol. 45, no. 3, 2008, pp. 289-294, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/210673934?accountid=27975

O’Neill, ,C.E. “Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities.” Choice, vol.

54, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1633, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1915872176?accountid=27975

Roszak, Theodore. The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Bantam Books, 1996.

 

Vanderslice, Stephanie. “Beyond the Tipping Point: Creative Writing Comes of Age.” College

English, vol. 78, no. 6, 2016, pp. 602-613, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1799924542?accountid=27975

———————————————————————————————————-

Project Proposal

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Day Seven – Formal Presentation (Assignment)

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein – Which Character Would Victor Resurrect Next? For this class assignment, you will be required to take your reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or The Modern Promethus and apply critical thinking designed to implore creativity at the … Continue reading

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Day Six – Informal Presentation #1

The journal-article I chose is Adventures in Unveiling: Critical Pedagogy and Imagination, written by Sean Michael Morris, featured in Hybrid Pedagogy. Why I chose this journal-article was the how it seemed to combine the topics of pedagogy and imagination, first intrigued by the title and then read the article further. The imagination is sometimes the only tool and skill that I can possess in writing, and the thought that a creative process could be utilized in a more technical writing setting is a comforting thought. At the least, I understand that writing of any genre relies on creativity and imagination but it may or may not prove more difficulty with technical and digital writing. To that end, I was interested in reading more of the article in order to grasp the theory in order to apply its theory into my own understanding of digital humanities. As exemplified in the article, critical pedagogy is the philosophy of education and social movement that has developed and applied concepts from critical theory and related traditions to the field of education and the study of culture.

The author’s central topic or argument seems to be that imagination is lost in education and teaching, and relays the benefits and strength of using imagination in the classroom (regardless of subject such as math, science, English, etc.). In the author’s opening statement, a personal example was used, whereas it relates to a time in the author’s life as a high school student in American Studies (or history). In short, the author wrote a paper theorizing that General Robert Lee lost the Civil War on purpose to ‘preserve’ the South. This paper was considered too radical or philosophical, rejected by the school and dismissed with the author being moved to another class as a result. The paper is implied to have used imagination, seeking out alternative process of thought and theorizing that is thus rejected or dismissed by schools.

How the author explains this argument further is stating that “imagination is important to the project of critical pedagogy precisely because of the responsive nature of its practice. We must be able to think on our toes if education (of all kinds) is meant to be liberative. Liberation depends upon a thought—a thought that things as they are can be different than they are” (Morris). He continues to argue that education (like teachers) view imagination to be fragile and vulnerable, that it lacks academic integrity or certainty, the author arguing that most teachers value concrete fact over the unexpected train of thought. He dissects imagination into an equation of sorts, that change is based on hope (the struggle) with hope being based on imagination and thus acts as a revelation; without imagination, a classroom is without change or hope. In the end, Morris feels that education without change or hope is a process that is simply a list of requirements, checked off every day, week, month, year in a singular direction. Ultimately, the author’s concern is that his teacher and school “failed” him as a high school by failing to recognize the “whys of learning” or the attempt to quantify these whys into data; whys are the answer and/or questions regardless of whether they’re right, wrong, creative, or fearful. It is the element of these whys that inspire others to strive to understand in their own unique process and ask questions rather than the answers themselves; in the author’s case during high school years was the “gleeful sense of discovery” that was inspired by the imagination behind his thesis with Lee (Morris).

The importance of imagination in pedagogy (or any classroom) is that it can enable students and teachers alike to believe that things can be changed. I believe that it’s important as it demonstrates a skill or train of thought that helps students express themselves more openly and give the opportunity to genuinely learn or the desire to learn which may cause the knowledge to be retained better. I personally agree with the author that teachers should allow their students to read the material on their own rather than being read to them within a set of plans, assignments, charts, textbooks, or lectures. As Morris argues, teachers often do not teach “possibility, but rather conformity” without allowing the students to learn and express their own minds. Furthermore, as Morris explains in the article, education without imagination can be simply repetitive “training” that merely seeks to “status quo” and assumes the system it’s based upon is satisfactory without compromise. In my personal opinion, reflecting on my own occupation, the workplace benefits from imagination in training by making team-bonding or other activities that can strengthen the work group as well as provide a learning environment while pursuing entertainment at the same time. If the workplace can incorporate imagination with satisfactory results then why couldn’t education like high schools?

What else is preventing education to incorporate imagination into their learning and activities? What else is difficult in transcribing creative techniques and elements (like imagination) into other topics (like pedagogy)? What would be a good method of including imagination into the classroom in terms of activities or teaching? What else would constitute as a reasoning of why? Are there any college students that recall personal examples where imagination was rejected in the classroom? What would be defined as a part of the imagination and what would be defined as the opposite of imagination (like conformity)? (906)

http://hybridpedagogy.org/adventures-in-unveiling/

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Day Five – Prompt #5: Word Processing for Self-Reflection

As in every generation, the evolution in technology is constant whenever something becomes outdated and obsolete, requiring technology to be modified and allowed new functions and applications for new generations. In terms of word-processing, it is a basic function or knowledge where an individual or group of individuals communicate their thoughts and ideas by language (vocally or visually). With word-processing, recent generations relied on social network to express these thoughts and ideas by word-text. For example, the past generation used MySpace which later immigrated to Facebook to what is now considered to be the newest forms of such word-processed communication such as Twitter or Instagram. In time, Facebook will have its user population decline and be replaced by other social networks; below is a link to a recent study that observes such an event occurring now:

https://www.recode.net/2018/2/12/16998750/facebooks-teen-users-decline-instagram-snap-emarketer

A “bare-bones” text editor, is best suited for the technical user as it is used primarily in coding, the internal data of text. Specifically, the Sublime Text, it was the highly rated program on the reference link provided in the page. It allows those users to have greater degree of control and editing that is not as found in basic word-processors (like Microsoft Word).

Naturally, Microsoft Word has remained a constant tool that is versatile and reliable in many situations in the past and present. It works best with basic word-processing (with formatted text) for a variety of needs such as technical writing like educational purposes (essays for example) and creative writing (novel manuscripts for example). Its tools allow to better craft word-processing such as grammar or spell-checks that prevent common but easily missed errors.

Google Docs is a combination of word-processor with a spreadsheet application, allowing users to classify and arrange their documents in their desired format. This is useful for when users must record and hold onto important documents such as credentials or identification forms. It can also be used for presentations in the office setting with productive value and be converted into several types of file formats, enabling diversity among users and different software.

Scrivener is a word-processor and outliner (code-data) designed for authors, a management system that oversees documents as well as notes. It allows the user to organize notes, concepts, research and whole documents for easy access and reference. These functions are best suited for authors since it enables a greater sense of control and editing for long drafts of story-building. As a result, any writing that is word-processed by this program can be exported into standard word-processor or screenwriting software at a later time.

Wikipedia has its own uses by allowing users to the spread information through communication, using word-processing to develop its website and information for other users. With each user sharing their information, it utilizes self-reflection as a form of corrective procedure to complete the page of information. One of the difficulties with this, however, is that information can be corrupted or misused for other purposes with little to no validation on whether it is correct information based on evidence or not. (507)

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Day Four – Prompt #4: An Idea for Mapping a Text or a Topic

In the brief introduction of the chapter, it submits to the audience a simple question about maps: “what exactly do they do? What do they doo that cannot be done with words, that is; because, if it can be done with words, then maps are superfluous” (Moretti, 35). Some words, however, fail to elaborate the necessities of a journey in writing. An example of how maps help illustrate the story is how some prints of Treasure Island or Gulliver’s Travels include elaborate yet fictional maps while using common terminology, schematics, and oceanology to create realistic representations in certain cases. In relation to Treasure Island, it would help the audience see where the treasure was buried on the island on a map despite being told of its location to give the audience an in-depth feeling of being part of the story. Furthermore, Gulliver’s Travels has various different locations that the character journeys throughout this quest of returning home, getting lost in different, uncharted lands populated by little people, giants, and other strange creatures. For that reason, if it is an uncharted territory, it only makes rational sense that the character on the journey would wish to document it for others, fictional or non-fictional.

To that end, I see how a circular (or “3D, omnidirectional”) narrative space can be beneficial to a linear direction for the audience to explain the story. To know the surroundings around the story (a village, an island, etc.) helps the audience by giving the option of traveling along with the characters, enabling them to “backtrack” if necessary for reference points. As Moretti explains, “when a system is free to spread its energy in space’, writes Rudolf Arnheim, ‘it sends out its vectors evenly all around, like the rays emanating from a source of light. The resulting… pattern is the prototype of centric composition.’” (Moretti, 39). The audience thus has the freedom to extend their perspective or senses like the “rays” of light across the composition.

With Google MyMaps, a body of students can use these technological advances in mapping to construct a map (or “journey”) of places they’ve been or haven’t been to illustrate a story. For example, a student can put a layer for a general location and then use a marker to pinpoint that specific location like a birthplace; you could even go further than that by marking other locations of where you’ve moved and present a ‘linear’ path from past to present as a project. This would help promote creativity and design to students regardless of the subject (English, History, Biology, etc.). You could also use Timeline JS to illustrate a this ‘linear’ sense further with same effect of story-telling. In either case, a student could essentially present their life/background to a classroom, giving way to an opportunity to build new relationship between students (new and/or old). Below is an example, a journey from birthplace in the past to current location in the present as well as trips made outside the US:

https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1HDpd8ulmZjrK8Z8XXCxJukEs0S_Gd1goc030D7h5bbA&font=Default&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=650

(500)

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Day Three – Prompt #3: An Idea for Visualizing Frankenstein

In terms of visualizing Frankenstein, I wanted to explore a personal question in the hopes of applying a purpose or idea. I’d like to know how many reprints or revisions were made over the years as well as their popularity (or how many novels were purchased in a year) in a simple line-graph and/or scatter. Furthermore, I’d be interested in seeing how many film adaptions of Frankenstein were made from the earliest example to the most recent (like Daniel Radcliffle’s Victor Frankenstein) as well as their popularity in correspondence; these graphs may be included in the first set or separately. The reason for this inquiry is because I wonder if there is a colliding trend where an original classic is modified to create a newer version for new generations and if so, do these modifications impact the story’s popularity? Will this trend continue onward for years to come or will it eventually decline at a certain point?

The reason why I ask this question and strive for an answer is that over the course of history, stories like Frankenstein, Dracula, Wolf-Man, and others have endured throughout time as the most popular figures of horror. Despite any revisions, the generations are still exposed to these classics and carry onward as aspiring legends. I believe it’d be interesting to see any correlation between the rise of Frankenstein novels made in each year with the rise and/or fall of readers if any. As Moretti explains in Graphs Maps Trees, “the causal mechanism must thus be external to the genres, and common to all: like a sudden, total change of their ecosystem. Which is to say: a change of their audience. Books survive if they are read and disappear if they aren’t: and when an entire generic system vanishes at once, the likeliest explanation is that its readers vanished at once” (Moretti, 20). Based from Moretti’s explanation, it is a matter of generations that creates the certain style and mental state that is conformed by “the trigger action of the social and cultural process…” (Moretti, 21).

I’d like to use the line-graph featured in Figure 8 as the template(s) of my proposed visualization of the text as exemplified below here (Moretti, 15-16). In this case, the Y axis (horizontal) would be the number of purchases/readers with the X axis being the time-frame in decades, each point of the line (or dot) representing a different novel/film.

The advantages of using this model can be the simplistic direction that the data can followed by these guidelines that I’ve set as well as the purpose of the research. It is also an advantage to use this model because having more than one ‘line’ overlapping another would indicate the trend that I envision will occur more clearly. The disadvantages of using this model that I foresee, however, are that having more than one graph colliding with each would cause confusion. Another obstacle would be how difficult it would be to interpret the data and results of the graph. (501)

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Day Two – Prompt #2: Ideas for Engaging Frankenstein with Purpose

As a graduate student studying in literature, I contend that I will teach on a particular level at some point in time. During my undergraduate studies, I have pursued studies in creative writing as well. For that reason, I’m happy to find that activities as a form of exploration for students can invoke creativity within digitization. These activities deprive from creativity through adaptability and flexibility through necessity to be inventive with new, advancing technology in that regard. Furthermore, these activities will need to not only flexible but integrate these activities to the lesson plan; using old, relatable information or lessons to go over new skills and recent information for example. With that, the classroom activity of my choice would be a character role play or debate.

In the chapter, the activity that incorporates digitization like “Twitter, Tumblr, and Facebook by asking students to perform a debate that demonstrates and deepens their knowledge of course content” (Battershill & Ross, 88). Alternatively, it can be performed outside the classroom by having the students perform and record the debate through YouTube. This activity can be best used during a time of absence and/or approaching date of testing, project, or another important assignment.

With Frankenstein, a debate between characters would be beneficial as the story utilizes archetypes and conflicting perspectives. For example, Victor Frankenstein and the Creature would be the most obvious debate between archetypes. Furthermore, these two characters have such a developed relationship and overarching viewpoints that act like water against fire. With a student’s participation, however, the discussion with each character can go both ways such as the good being perceived as the bad or the guilty as the innocent.

Naturally, one of the drawbacks of this activity can be a student or group of students may be hesitant to participate in such an engaging display of theatrics. From personal experience, I know how stressful it is to perform before an audience but at the same time, I’ve pursued theater courses in a university setting and I’ve come to enjoy such activities now. Another drawback is that it would require time and explanation prior to the activity. Any misinterpretation of the activity and its instructions can disrupt the students’ mindset, possibly failing to grasp the lessons intended.

I would construct this activity (or project) by splitting the groups of students evenly, a classroom of twelve (12) students would be broken up into groups of three (2) for example. The activity would be two students pose as the characters, given out and supervised by the teacher, and the students would be left to their devices; such as the theme/topic of the debate, the script, the video-taping, the presentation. The debate would be held by each candidate (or “character”) within five (5) minutes each to discuss their side of the argument; the topics must be submitted to the teacher prior to the presentation in order to prevent “repeats.” With two students to each group, the grading would be simpler as well. (498)

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