Blog Post #5 Intercultural Paradox

The us-them dynamic in the intercultural paradox has a strong presence in our class. We are constantly studying other cultures that surround us in our everyday lives. We do not use the monism approach because we do not view other culture as inferior to our own or the people who have brought that culture to America. Instead, we take the relativism view as we are studying other cultures and how they have shaped Arlington and Groningen today. We are appreciating the cultures instead of viewing them as a bad thing. A monism person would think it is a negative impact on our country to have such a wide variety of cultures in certain areas. This is not the case as we are simply discovering how the spread of culture shaped the neighborhoods and people we live around and near. Our purpose is to add to our basic understanding of globalization and its effects.

Communicative Moral Universalism is the idea that someone who accepts the undeniable fact that they will be surrounded by those of other cultures, and embraces it, will be better off.  A person who practices this will try to break down the barriers between the cultures as if there were none at all. Everyone is equal and has human rights which means culture makes someone different but not inferior or superior. One culture is not better than another simply because it is your own. Communicative Moral Universalism may welcome the idea of other views and practices. Even if the first attempt does not go as planned, they will continue to try and learn how they can change to better understand.

Each country has a different way to go about schooling so each member our of group has a different background. This does not make one of us better than the other. It allows us to work together and learn how others might approach an assignment or topic differently. This may be an alternative we had never thought of and could be more efficient or aid us in our end goal. The collaboration is seen on all sides and this makes us stronger as a group then an individual. Our diversity of ideas ensure we will have enough input to create something we all approve of in the end.

 

One Comment on “Blog Post #5 Intercultural Paradox

  1. What you say is very true: “Each country has a different way to go about schooling so each member our of group has a different background. This does not make one of us better than the other. It allows us to work together and learn how others might approach an assignment or topic differently.” Can you give a specific example of how different group members approached the assignment differently?

    van Asperen suggests that cultural exchanges are fairly complex — what does she mean by the Intercultural Paradox?

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