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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Sample Annotated Source for Proposal, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 7 months ago

    Some sources I found for IDEA #2 for final project:

    Book Source: Richardson, Catherine. Shakespeare and Material Culture. Oxford University Press, 2012.

    Book Source: Riggio, Milla C […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Final Project Ideas, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 8 months ago

    Two possible project ideas to focus on:

    Write about Shakespeare’s love relationships in plays and how they might correlate with his own views or romantic relationships. Can we get to know more about […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Travel Posts, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 8 months ago

    Before trip:

    I am so excited, so excited that I did not sleep at all last night. I had this butterfly feeling in my stomach for a while now, a feeling I get every time I am about to leave the country. I love […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Speech Idea for Rome Pt 2., on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 9 months ago

    After reflecting on the passage I have chosen  to record, which is the speech given by Brutus to Cassius in Act 1 scene 2 which in some sense stirs the plot, I have decided that the best day to record it would be […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Youtube Video, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 9 months ago

     

     

     

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Genre in flux-Antony & Cleopatra, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 9 months ago

    A scene from Antony and Cleopatra that represents a “genre in flux” would be the ending scene where Antony commits suicide and Cleopatra as well. At this point of the story, the story of Antony and Cleopatra shi […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Coriolanus-, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

     

    In Act 1 scene 1 of Coriolanus, the reader first encounters the conflict or the main problem that the society faces that then shapes the protagonist’s actions. In Act 1, readers come across a mob, a group of […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Speech Idea For Rome:, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    Lines(170-184) from Julius Caesar ( Act 1 scene 2) :
    BRUTUS:
    That you do love me, I am nothing jealous.
    What you would work me to, I have some aim.
    How I have thought of this, and of these times,
    I shall […]

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    Michaela Lewis and Profile picture of Stella HuitzStella Huitz are now friends 1 year, 10 months ago

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Friendship Vs Leadership, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    In Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar Act 1-2, one is introduced to Julius Caesar himself and to other important characters such as: Calphurnia (Julius Caesar’s wife), Brutus, Portia (Brutus’s wife), Cassius, Mark Antony […]

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Group Four:, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    GROUP 4 Discussion Questions:

    1.“Actions speak louder than words” Do you think this is true in Shakespeare’s Rome?

    2. What does the easy sway of opinion by the Romans in this scene (Act 3 scene 2)  say a […]

    • Act 3 scene 3 seems to primarily demonstrate the rising levels of violence and civil strife in Rome and how uncontrollable the rage of the mob is.

    • – Brutus is easily persuaded by Cassius to conspiracy to kill Caesar, even though he did like Caesar. He is not as honorable as he was since he betrayed caeser.
      – He might fall
      – I believe that Mark Anthony will fight against Brutus and the conspirators and will beat them.

    • 2.It shows the mob mentally of the people of Rome. Shakespeare seems to actively dislike them because they don’t think for themselves. They are all easily swayed by both speeches.

    • 1. I think that words speak just as loudly as actions in this play. Words help lead into the actions that are to come further in the play, the words speak loudly but not very clearly.

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Group Three:, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    GROUP 3 Discussion Questions:

    Caesar refuses the final warning (Artemidorus’s letter that contained details of his assassination with a list of all the conspirators) for the last time. At this point, do you t […]

    • 1) Caesar knew it was his fate when he walked into the Senate that day that he would die by his Senator’s hand. He previously mentioned that he did not have a fear of dying, as the empire was most likely going to continue past his lifetime. He also may have come in with the intention of being able to dissuade the conspirators from killing him, which ended up being very untrue.
      2) Artemidorus knew about the conspiracy because of the soothsayer and his previous warnings to Caesar. Brutus’ wife, Portia, may have also known because of his panicked and cryptic behavior the evening before the murder occurred.
      3) The kneeling could have signified the deification of Caesar to the conspirators, almost like worshipping a sacrifice to a god (like a lamb for the slaughter, or like how Jesus was sacrificed for the greater good of society). It also could have signaled a reverence for the deed that was about to happen. The conspirators knew Caesar was a great man, and Brutus even mentioned that they killed him so that he would not have to know death and paranoia all his life.
      4) In the Bible, when Jesus was about to be betrayed by Judas, Judas kisses him on the cheek. Before the betrayal of Caesar by Brutus, Brutus kisses Caesar’s hand.
      5) In a way, he was being used. Brutus, as a praetor of Rome, had a very close connection to Caesar, but it also made the people like and trust him as a public judge of Rome. Ultimately, though, it was his downfall, and he may have killed himself at the end of the play because he knew that he did not have to kill Caesar, that he was being used, and his guilty conscience got the best of him.

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Group Two:, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    GROUP 2 Discussion Questions:

    Why do you think Brutus starts to take lead of Caesar’s assassination despite his relationship with Caesar? Does this make him a bad person? Why or why not?
    Does Brutus have […]

    • 2) I think Brutus has the potential of being an effective leader because he shows honor and positive reputation among the Roman citizens and before joining the conspirators Brutus was careful on why he believes Caesar should die.

    • 1. I think he feels that what he is doing is the right thing to do for the Roman Empire and because of that he decides to take the lead. Cassius was able to convince him that this was the right thing to do. Being a “bad” person is subjective and what you think makes a bad person. I think anyone who wants to kill someone else makes a bad person. I don’t think plotting to kill someone is something a good person would do. Also he was friends with Caesar and friends don’t turn on their friends.

    • In Act 2 scene 2- what can be taken away in regards to women’s role in Roman society?

      Act 2 Scene 2, portrays women as weak and powerless. For example, when Calphurnia dreamt about Caesar’s murder, Caesar and Decius Brutus disregarded her interpretation and made her seem that she was crazy and her dreams were foolish and unreasonable.

    • 4. Did Caesar know he was walking into his assassination? Was it fate or could have it been prevented?

      – As discussed in class the word of Caesar’s death spread as a rumour around r Rome. I find it odd that everyone knew about the assertion but Caesar. Caesars closest circle and follower knew ( some even attempted to warn him). He still died. Perhaps this is Shakespeare foreshadowing that his death was fate? That everyone knew, and efforts were made to prevent it, yet it occurred. proving it was fated that Caesar must die

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Group One:, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    GROUP 1 Discussion Questions:

    What does the opening scene say about Caesar’s leadership/ authority ? Do you think Caesar was a good leader? Why or why not? – Use evidence from text for explanation.
    Act 1 […]

    • 5.) This scene suggests that when there is bad weather such as thunder and lighting that the gods are angry with them. When Cassius is talking to Casca he tells him that he has bared his bosom to the thunderstone. Cassius feels that the bad weather is a warning sign and it warns against the tyranny of Caesar, while Casca feels as though the bad weather is a sign of bad luck and that something bad usually follows. As they are planning the assassination thunder shakes Rome like no other day has seen, and Cassius feels like this is the perfect time to assassinate Caesar while Casca feels the opposite.

    • In the opening scene, it seems like there is one person that is being very cautious over Caesar. That act shows that he held a high authority and his leadership is very influential to his people especially the soothsayer who spoke out for him to “Beware the ides of March”. I do think Caesar was a good leader over his people, I definitely think the jealousy from those who betrayed and murdered him proves that because of their motives for killing him.

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    Stella Huitz wrote a new post, Hello World, on the site Travel Blog 1 year, 10 months ago

    My adventure starts here! I am enrolled in the global classroom “Topics in Performance- Shakespeare’s Rome” at MU and will be traveling to Rome in the spring of 2019. The following posts will be reading responses […]

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    Stella Huitz‘s profile was updated 1 year, 10 months ago