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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, “Bad people” are not evil by nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 6 months ago

    In chapter II, Olaudah Equiano was forced into a ship of slaves by the crew, and he lived in hell for weeks with other slaves. During his stay with the crew, Equiano found they were not “bad” by nature. Ins […]

    • I was really intrigued by your title! It feels like you are arguing that people are perpetuated into treating others poorly (captors and slaves). I don’t think most people believe that whites, the ones helped perpetuate the triangle trade, are institutionalized like slaves are.

    • Equiano in writing his story definitely sought to gain the hearts of his readers by appealing to their Christian values. He definitely looked for advocates to his cause.

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Indirect Speech in Mansfield Park, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 7 months ago

    British female writer Jane Austin is characterized by her wide usage of free indirect speech in novels and is considered to be one of the pioneers who used free indirect speech. As a significant product of Jane […]

    • Free-Indirect Discourse is essential for understanding how Austen’s narrative style functions–this is so important to explore. What exactly is “free indirect discourse,” though? What does it allow Austen–or her narrator–to do?

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Noble mind, the very beauty of human nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 7 months ago

    Fanny Price had been instilled with the idea by his aunt Mansfield Park that she was nobody to the family and even to the world. However, Fanny was a tough and persistent girl to secure her vulnerable dignity with […]

    • This is true. With the type of narration for this piece, readers definitely sympathize with Fanny. She endured many obstacles and difficult circumstances, but when reading the introduction I came to learn that this character is least favorable with readers.

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Marriage as Prison for Maria, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 7 months ago

    In Maria’s tragic life, she had a terrible marriage and was finally imprisoned in a mental institution by his husband, George Venables. As a matter of fact, Maria has done nothing wrong, but her entire life was a […]

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Manipulative Power and Brutality of Victoria, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 7 months ago

    In Charlotte Dacre’s gothic novel Zofloya; or, The Moor, Victoria is shaped like the main heroine, which carries the characteristics of being manipulative, brutal and violent. The dark side of Victoria’s per […]

    • This is a very interesting response, which I think capitalizes on a central point in the novel–the danger of artifice, particularly in the hands of a sexually-driven woman. Megalena and Theresa, too, share both the sexually-driven quality and the powers of artifice (77, 105, 109). In each case, the language of “seduction” is used to join sexuality with a kind of hyper-masculinized power–notice the language of wildness, pride, fierceness, turbulence, adventurousness, and so on, all of which are associated with Victoria and Megalena. You put it well when you describe Victoria’s “absolutely dominant position.” This post is interesting in that it gets at the role of seduction in the novel; however, I wonder if it reads these characters from an unacknowledged ideological perspective. For instance, Berenza is passionately in love with Victoria–perhaps? Isn’t there anything about Berenza that we should also be suspicious of? And, remember, he is drawn to her difference, her fierceness, her wildness, her “strong and resolute mind” (76).

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Study of the past: the saint and the witch, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 7 months ago

    To judge a person, we need to know what he/she has done, over a longer period, or even in his/her whole life. So I would like to take a step back and look at what happened before the story. There are two people […]

    • In every story plot there arises a problem and a solution to fix the problem. In this case Madame Duval’s character is problematic. Could this be a commentary on aristocratic individuals at the time?

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Double-Standards of the 18-Century, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Double-Standards of the 18-Century, on the site Origins of the "Novel" The author satires the double standards of 18 century UK society towards two groups of people: 1.A […] View

    I am trying to be more focused on a topic, but it seems like I’m not doing very well on that, it strays from the point by the middle part…Anyway, what I’m trying to say is: Double standard and class discrimination is a social phenomenon, which was never seen as a problem before the idea of “equality” was brought to us.(Not saying it’s perfect…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In London people apply the best costumes, wear wonderful clothes and attend the best social events. It was the heart of Europe. […] View

    I agree that it must be tough for Evalina, showing up without the possibility of knowing how should she behave, as she mentioned, she hoped very much that there is a guide or something to tell her all about it before the embarrassment happened.

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Evelina: The lowly, country, bumpkin comes to London., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, Evelina: The lowly, country, bumpkin comes to London., on the site Origins of the "Novel" First off, I would like to say that Evelina has been the most interesting book I’ve encountered s […] View

    I agree that it’s certainly a fascinating book to read, and I think it works better for bringing readers “in” the book than most of the others we had this semester. Just like most of us, Evalina learns from the not-so-joyful memories of embarrassments and improves her adaptability to the environment. And I do somehow worry about her, although…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: k0g71330 wrote a new post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Through various characters in Evelina, Frances Burney demonstrates the preoccupation with reputation and propriety that is […] View

    I feel that the author is trying to express her opinions in an appropriate way as a female writer at 18-century, by leading us to take the view of Evelina, Villars, and Orville, they seemed to be “too perfect,” those characters are apparently very special comparing with the others. Perhaps, I would guess, the ideas of the author hides in those…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Double-Standards of the 18-Century, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    The author satires the double standards of 18 century UK society towards two groups of people:

    1.A male-ruling society double-standard the moral principles of male and female. Relatively lenient on men and […]

    • I am trying to be more focused on a topic, but it seems like I’m not doing very well on that, it strays from the point by the middle part…Anyway, what I’m trying to say is: Double standard and class discrimination is a social phenomenon, which was never seen as a problem before the idea of “equality” was brought to us.(Not saying it’s perfect today, but we’re always trying) And it seems that the author of this book is suggesting that some people, including the author herself, sees this as something unpleasant and hopefully changeable — pointing out the problem is already a great leap at 18 century.
      It is very interesting to learn that doctor is a higher class above us; perhaps that’s a culture difference? I’m not sure what you guys do here, but personally, I would prefer the same respect for all work nature and income class.

    • We can definitely look at the way that different classes are treated differently in this book; let’s start there! What different classes (or “kinds” of people, if we don’t make it into socioeconomic class) are evident in the novel? How are they distinguished from one another? And then, are there moments where these distinctions break down? Note the structure I’m embedding into this response.

      For instance, the Branghtons are routinely held up as ridiculous by Burney; their manners are poor, they are boorish, they don’t understand polite taste. Orville, however, is held up as admirable by Burney; his manners are impeccable, and his understanding of taste is elevated and polite. Evelina is described as “naturally” genteel, though she may lack polish. Evelina elevates Orville’s taste over that of the Branghtons’. Is it merely a coincidence that Orville is a member of the nobility, while the Branghtons are steeped in the middle-class world of commerce? Can they ever, in this system, be “genteel”? That is a question we can ask of the novel, and of Burney’s own blind spots and class-based agenda.

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Our sentimental Mr.Yorick travels across France, all the way from North to South, gathering random little stories […] View

    Thanks! I have some guessings in the map so that they might be not accurate. 1.There are two places named “Montreuil”, which is probably what the author mean by “Montriul”: one is next to Paris, the other is a small village between Calais and Nampont which doesn’t pop out automatically when you search for the none existing place “Montriul…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Our sentimental Mr.Yorick travels across France, all the way from North to South, gathering random little stories […] View

    Sure this one needs to be read deeper, it gave me a hard time trying to understand the true meanings, and I have a feeling like I only see the shell of the story…

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Sentimental Journey and Language, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Sentimental Journey and Language, on the site Origins of the "Novel" The eighteenth century was a time for exploration and travel. Much literature was written within this period which […] View

    The language Sterne used is certainly very indirect, I saw many different explains about what he actually means about the parts that Virginia Woolf claims to be pure poetry, I was rather shocked, as I couldn’t see anything as a second language… But I did like his ironical, becoming the finest wit in Paris by agrees with everyone 🙂

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Sentimental Journey 101, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Sentimental Journey 101, on the site Origins of the "Novel" While reading this novel, many questions were in my mind; How sentimental Yorick is? How would he describe Sentimental […] View

    I agree with you, Yorick claims to be a sentimental traveler, yet he does not act like one. Yorick claims to have unchangeable deep love and loyalty to Eliza, yet he tries to have a relationship with each and every good looking female he can see. And he hires a young lad who knows nothing but flirting with girls as his squire, why does it sound…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, None for you, Monk., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, None for you, Monk., on the site Origins of the "Novel" Religion is not a main topic of concern of Laurence Sterne in his A Sentimental Journey, it is however, mentioned just often enough to […] View

    I was very curious when I first read about the monk, why was there a monk in 18 century of France? Did he mean a Buddhist monk or other religion?(Are other religions called monks?) Back to the topic, it seems, that Yorick gave the monk something mainly to keep him from telling the fair lady about how rude he was. Perhaps it is also one of the…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    Our sentimental Mr.Yorick travels across France, all the way from North to South, gathering random little stories on the way, having relationships with different girls.

    So where is the sentimental anyway? It […]

    • Interesting insight. The language used in the novel is very ironic. Meaning that it has to be read on a deeper level. I wonder how his use of language affects how we perceive the characters he comes in contact. It is almost as if we envision these characters based on Yoric’s description to be kind, subtle, or helpful.

      • Sure this one needs to be read deeper, it gave me a hard time trying to understand the true meanings, and I have a feeling like I only see the shell of the story…

    • I love your map! I thought about doing that myself to see where he traveled, but thankfully don’t have to because you did it! I agree that Yorick does come off as somewhat of a Lothario during his “adventures.” It is interesting that you and Sana concentrated on the sentimental aspect of his personality, especially in regards to women (who seem to be the gender he’s most interested in).
      You say, “it is almost like the female has heard what his thoughts and answering him,” which makes me wonder how much of the conversation the reader is actually privy to. I also wonder how much of his meetings with women are embellished to make himself appear more attractive to the reader.

      • Thanks! I have some guessings in the map so that they might be not accurate. 1.There are two places named “Montreuil”, which is probably what the author mean by “Montriul”: one is next to Paris, the other is a small village between Calais and Nampont which doesn’t pop out automatically when you search for the none existing place “Montriul”. 2.The other is by the end, there is no such place called “Mount Tauturia” or even something close to it at all! I can only guess by the conversation he was having with the peasant family, probably somewhere between Lyon(s) and Modane.(No mountains by the west of Lyon)
        And for fun I even put the places in an app to automatically set up a trip plan, it looks pretty interesting, I almost regret for not taking the time to visit France when I was in UK:)

    • I think you’re right, that Yorick’s sentimentalism is rather erotic–this is also about power, though, and his ability to “condescend” or “feel for” these beautiful, fragile, less-fortunate women. I am not sure it’s a question of him either being sentimental to women or removed from men, however; what is similar in his relationships to those less fortunate than himself? Might there be anything broadly “erotic” in that relationship?

      The map is a great idea! Several readers have made similar maps, and we’ll look at this one tomorrow as a great example of the novel’s spatial imaginary: http://enec3120.neatline-uva.org/neatline/show/a-sentimental-journey

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Literacy in the Eighteenth Century, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Literacy in the Eighteenth Century, on the site Origins of the "Novel" With the changes to print and the printing press during the eighteenth century, “a larger production of text” wer […] View

    As you mentioned, lots of technology and society progressive happened at the time of Pamela. A brave new world has led to the rise of the novel. We can surely find some tracks about the readers of the first novels, analyzing historical, social phenomenon from the best sell books could be fascinating. Perhaps the success of Pamela shows the inner…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Pamela is a very interesting novel to read especially because it is mainly based on letters. Letters are told in the first person; emotions […] View

    As you have pointed out, the whole book is all about Pamela in her perspective. Your point inspired me to this question: Can we assume what Pamela is trying the hide is Richardson’s dark inner thoughts? Perhaps, I just guess, maybe he fantasises himself to be in a position of Mr.B: Find a perfect girl, lock her up, try different ways to rape h…[Read more]

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    Rongling Tang commented on the post, Morally Boring and Mildly Enraging, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 5 years, 8 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, Morally Boring and Mildly Enraging, on the site Origins of the "Novel" When I first read through the Pamela excerpt I was . . . enraged, flabbergasted, and frustrated with Pamela’s c […] View

    I have the same feeling, find the book boring, and hard to agree with the world Richardson tries to form. It’s a weird story indeed, especially with a view of today’s law and society. And I like the idea of “happy medium”, which reminds me about steak. Rarely would people prefer the extreme of “raw Roxana” or “overcooked Pamela”, around medium s…[Read more]

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