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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Due Oct. 30th – Inquiry conclusion, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, “Bad people” are not evil by nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In chapter II, Olaudah Equiano was forced into a ship of slaves by the crew, and he lived in hell for weeks […] View

    Equiano in writing his story definitely sought to gain the hearts of his readers by appealing to their Christian values. He definitely looked for advocates to his cause.

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Due Oct. 30th – Inquiry conclusion, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, “Bad Girls World”, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Women who do not behave within the societal norms of the eighteenth century are marginalized; however, those very characters are often the […] View

    These characters are very interesting, they were definitely not bound to norms of their society, and at times readers were drawn to these characters because they did not adhere to the conditions and circumstances that surrounded them for example they saw no limits.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Historical Notions of the Novel, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    According to John Richetti piece, the novel in what we commonly think of it today is a twentieth century notion. Novel what we term as “prose fiction” is a current perception. Today, we view novel as Ric […]

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Equiano and Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    Olaudah Equiano is an individual who seeks to appeal to the sentiments of his readers. He uses first person narration, and discusses the events that have happened within his life, as if he were recalling the past […]

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Wollstonecraft and Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    Mary Wollstonecraft’s style in Maria, The Wrongs of Woman, is interesting, as seen in the diction and sentence structure. The language is very formal, and it is as if the author is making a declaration to the a […]

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Noble mind, the very beauty of human nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Noble mind, the very beauty of human nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Fanny Price had been instilled with the idea by his aunt Mansfield Park that she was nobody to the […] View

    This is true. With the type of narration for this piece, readers definitely sympathize with Fanny. She endured many obstacles and difficult circumstances, but when reading the introduction I came to learn that this character is least favorable with readers.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Jane Austen and Narration, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    Jane Austen’s style is interesting, as seen in the type of narration found in her novel, Mansfield Park. Jane Austen narrates, as an omniscient narrator. She goes into the feelings and thoughts of each c […]

    • Austen’s narrative choices and her use of voice is very important to a complete understanding of the novel–good observation! However, I am unclear what Shakespeare has to do with understanding exactly how her narration works. For instance, there is a lot of material to explain in the long quote you give from Mansfield Park to illustrate narration. While we do see there how Mrs. Norris sees Fanny, the narrator doesn’t do so uncritically–we are also given a sense of Mrs. Norris’ selfishness. So, the whole novel is focalized, too, from a perspective that puts Fanny in the center of the narration. You are right when you say that “the narrator seems to sympathize with Fanny”–but how, exactly? You can say much more about this, and eliminate the discussion of Shakespeare, which doesn’t have much on the surface of it to do with this issue of narration.

      What is useful for your analysis of Austen’s style in the Pollack-Pelzner piece, is more what he says about how the narrator urges us to side with and against different characters. When you’re using a secondary source, your goal is not primarily just to incorporate it, but to use it purposively to help you illustrate or shape your claim. In this case, your injection of Shakespeare seems unnecessary, as you have other more interesting ideas that can be more fully explored!

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Marriage as Prison for Maria, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 9 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Marriage as Prison for Maria, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In Maria’s tragic life, she had a terrible marriage and was finally imprisoned in a mental institution by his h […] View

    I agree although family was meant to serve as a source of stability and identity, characters still felt constraints.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Jane Austen’s Style-Mansfield Park, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    Jane Austen’s text, Mansfield Park, depicts the changes in her current nation of the eighteenth century of the changes in politics, and her changes that have occurred to Austen as a writer. Her writing differs f […]

    • This is an effective assessment of the complexity of Austen’s sentence style and voice–you have several examples in here, which is good! Can you say more about your very last sentence, though, which for me as a reader is the most piquant moment? How exactly does the syntactical complexity show “the complex relationship[s] and emotions” expressed in the novel? You might also explain a bit more fully what you mean by complexity (and “formality,” which I’m not quite sure about?), and show what parts of the examples you give are particularly interesting sytlistically.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Zofloya and Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    Zofloya is a story whose main plot is a tragedy. This novel is classified as a gothic novel (“Dacre, Zofloya, 1806”). This is a gothic novel because the story’s outcome is a “tragedy.” Also, Victoria’ […]

    • Interesting collection of ideas here about the novel–I like your interest in the effects of the novel and its passionate, gothic style. I am also intrigued by your point that Victoria is a tragic character–that could make for a very interesting post in and of itself! I do think we need more focused attention on one key thing you notice, however, and then show how you see that in the book. For instance, if Victoria is a tragic character, why do you think so? What evidence in the novel do we get to see her as a character whose fall we should find pitiable?

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Study of the past: the saint and the witch, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Study of the past: the saint and the witch, on the site Origins of the "Novel" To judge a person, we need to know what he/she has done, over a longer period, or even in his/her […] View

    In every story plot there arises a problem and a solution to fix the problem. In this case Madame Duval’s character is problematic. Could this be a commentary on aristocratic individuals at the time?

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Sassy Ladies for the Win, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, Sassy Ladies for the Win, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Mrs. Selwyn is what a woman ought to be: opinionated, sarcastic, and intelligent. Our darling Evelina, who has grown to be so […] View

    Manners and wit are extremely important in a satire like this. Wit is properly used to expose the behaviors of many characters within the story.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Evelina’s Education, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    Evelina’s knowledge of social norms is something that Evelina has learned as time progresses. This knowledge can be coined in the term as Evelina’s education. There is a difference between the ways in which Eve […]

    • I do agree that Evelina’s “education consists [sic] of learning the social norms of her community.” She learns what to do from the Mirvan family, what not to do from her own family (Duval and Branghton), and finally how she can finally step into her own being in the third volume. What I do find most interesting (and I wrote about this in my own response) is her acceptance of Mrs. Selwyn’s decidedly anti-lady like behavior. I think Evelina has an appreciation for those who have lived amongst an elite society, especially since she was on the outskirts of acceptability when she started her education about social norms.

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    In reply to: k0g71330 wrote a new post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Through various characters in Evelina, Frances Burney demonstrates the preoccupation with reputation and propriety that is […] View

    Interesting conclusion. Maybe Burney questioned whether these conventions were suitable to all individuals, even in various geographical locations. I wonder what audiences Burney sought to appeal?

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 10 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In London people apply the best costumes, wear wonderful clothes and attend the best social events. It was the heart of Europe. […] View

    It is true that Evelina and Roxana differed greatly. I would say that Evelina’s situation was somewhat drastic from the beginning, which put her in uncomfortable situations when she grew older.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Burney’s Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 11 months ago

    Author of Evelina, Frances Burney’s style when writing her text is unique. While she strongly encourages creativity, she still sticks to the conventions of the day which draw on Fielding’s notion of capturing the […]

    • I don’t know if I would agree that the entirety of emotion comes from the parents (Lady Howard, Mr. Villars, or even Mrs. Mirvan who does act as sort of a parent to Evelina). While they do provide emotional aspects to the novel (concern and care over Evelina’s well being), much of the emotion comes from Evelina’s own perspective (her embarrassment and shock throughout much of the first volume). It is interesting that you chose to focus on the parental aspect of the novel, rather than Evelina’s dominant perspective.

    • While I’m not sure about the logic of “realism” working here, it is definitely the case that this is a novel of education; in addition to being a “novel of manners,” it is also a Bildungsroman. Evelina is able to succeed in part because of her education. What has her education been like, specifically? How does her education in London (first with the Mirvans and then with the Branghtons/Duval) offer different or competing models? These would be interesting questions to ask!

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, None for you, Monk., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 11 months ago

    In reply to: Mo wrote a new post, None for you, Monk., on the site Origins of the "Novel" Religion is not a main topic of concern of Laurence Sterne in his A Sentimental Journey, it is however, mentioned just often enough to […] View

    Interesting. It is almost as if when creating the novel that audience awareness was a key point for Sterne. With this new emerging readership, it is as if Sterne addresses the concerns of the day, such as religion, politics, economic questions that plagued many individuals at the time. Maybe the language that Yoric uses to describe characters,…[Read more]

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 11 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Our sentimental Mr.Yorick travels across France, all the way from North to South, gathering random little stories […] View

    Interesting insight. The language used in the novel is very ironic. Meaning that it has to be read on a deeper level. I wonder how his use of language affects how we perceive the characters he comes in contact. It is almost as if we envision these characters based on Yoric’s description to be kind, subtle, or helpful.

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    mnm53290 wrote a new post, Sentimental Journey and Language, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 11 months ago

    The eighteenth century was a time for exploration and travel. Much literature was written within this period which explored the many sights seen and individuals encountered. This type of literature was called, […]

    • While I would like to agree that Chaucer’s tales and this book have a lot in common, as you suggest, I am not entirely convinced. Chaucer’s tales seem to be more about contrasting stories between characters so reveal each character’s true nature; whereas Yorick is really just milling about Europe to buy stuff, judge people, and write. Admittedly, he is revealing characteristics about the people he meets, but it comes through the filter of his perspective. I think as readers we have to be skeptical of what Yorick is telling us and what it actually means (long story short, I agree with you about that).

    • The language Sterne used is certainly very indirect, I saw many different explains about what he actually means about the parts that Virginia Woolf claims to be pure poetry, I was rather shocked, as I couldn’t see anything as a second language… But I did like his ironical, becoming the finest wit in Paris by agrees with everyone 🙂

    • I’m glad you wrote about Sterne’s style here–I think we can press on this, too. What is the nature of his style? What characterizes it, specifically, and how might it be related to the context of travel–which is where your post begins? This definitely is a book with a style that seeks actively to engage the reader, on an emotional level. How do we see that functioning?

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    mnm53290 commented on the post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 3 years, 11 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Pamela is a very interesting novel to read especially because it is mainly based on letters. Letters are told in the first person; emotions […] View

    Interesting. Pamela is limited by her own perspectives and views, but this novel seems to have many layers. It is interesting how the sense of audience, and who this novel was intended, is another factor to consider.

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