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    Mo wrote a new post, “Bad Girls World”, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 3 months ago

    Women who do not behave within the societal norms of the eighteenth century are marginalized; however, those very characters are often the most interesting through the novel. In Roxana Roxana is on the outskirts […]

    • These characters are very interesting, they were definitely not bound to norms of their society, and at times readers were drawn to these characters because they did not adhere to the conditions and circumstances that surrounded them for example they saw no limits.

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    Mo commented on the post, Due Oct. 30th – Inquiry conclusion, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 3 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, “Bad people” are not evil by nature, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In chapter II, Olaudah Equiano was forced into a ship of slaves by the crew, and he lived in hell for weeks […] View

    I was really intrigued by your title! It feels like you are arguing that people are perpetuated into treating others poorly (captors and slaves). I don’t think most people believe that whites, the ones helped perpetuate the triangle trade, are institutionalized like slaves are.

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    Mo wrote a new post, The Meek Shall Inherit a Fistful of Teeth, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 4 months ago

    Fanny’s character in Mansfield Park represents a sort of underdog that is seen in other Austen novels and in Burney’s Evelina. Austen’s novels typically end in a happy ending for the heroine of the novel. The s […]

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    Mo commented on the post, Evelina’s Education, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Evelina’s Education, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Evelina’s knowledge of social norms is something that Evelina has learned as time progresses. This knowledge can be coined in […] View

    I do agree that Evelina’s “education consists [sic] of learning the social norms of her community.” She learns what to do from the Mirvan family, what not to do from her own family (Duval and Branghton), and finally how she can finally step into her own being in the third volume. What I do find most interesting (and I wrote about this in my own…[Read more]

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    Mo wrote a new post, Sassy Ladies for the Win, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    Mrs. Selwyn is what a woman ought to be: opinionated, sarcastic, and intelligent. Our darling Evelina, who has grown to be so cultured in the six months she was away from Reverend Villars, could certainly learn […]

    • Manners and wit are extremely important in a satire like this. Wit is properly used to expose the behaviors of many characters within the story.

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    Mo commented on the post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Dancing as a Common Custom, on the site Origins of the "Novel" In London people apply the best costumes, wear wonderful clothes and attend the best social events. It was the heart of Europe. […] View

    I was under the impression that Evelina was raised in England, otherwise she would be more at ease in her conversations with Mon. Du Bois (which she adamantly avoids because she cannot speak French). Evelina’s amazement at a “private” ball is not because she’s used to different ones in France, but that she’s from the country and had no occasion to…[Read more]

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    Mo commented on the post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: k0g71330 wrote a new post, Social Norms in Evelina, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Through various characters in Evelina, Frances Burney demonstrates the preoccupation with reputation and propriety that is […] View

    Considering how fastidious Mr. Villars is to the rules of social engagement, it makes me wonder why Evelina was so inclined to embarrass herself as she was raised by a man who adheres to the norms. While I subconsciously took note of their manners, I hadn’t truly thought of it until now: the only thing that separates the Branghton family from the…[Read more]

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    Mo wrote a new post, Evelina: The lowly, country, bumpkin comes to London., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    First off, I would like to say that Evelina has been the most interesting book I’ve encountered since starting at MU. Moreover, it is a genuinely good book, not simply interesting “in comparison” to other books […]

    • I agree that it’s certainly a fascinating book to read, and I think it works better for bringing readers “in” the book than most of the others we had this semester. Just like most of us, Evalina learns from the not-so-joyful memories of embarrassments and improves her adaptability to the environment. And I do somehow worry about her, although she’s only a character in the novel(not a real person), will the bad memories bother her and potentially have other adverse side effects?

      • I think this is typically something we don’t need to worry about–unless reason for such concerns are given us in the novel. That is, does Burney suggest that we should be concerned about “bad memories”?

    • I seriously love this book. I’d never heard of Frances Burney before this class, but I’m a little bit obsessed with her now. I enjoyed reading your post; Evelina’s character growth is fascinating and so much fun to read through. I think it’s especially interesting because in many ways it is what the whole novel is about: a young girl’s development and how she is shaped by the world around her. I like that while Evelina is influenced by the customs and social norms she encounters, Burney does not present her as just being passively altered by her experiences. Rather, as you point out, Evelina uses her “acute observational skills” to “advance her situation” (quotes from your post). In this way, Evelina demonstrates her intelligence as well as her personal agency.

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    Mo commented on the post, Burney’s Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Burney’s Style, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Author of Evelina, Frances Burney’s style when writing her text is unique. While she strongly encourages creativity, she still sti […] View

    I don’t know if I would agree that the entirety of emotion comes from the parents (Lady Howard, Mr. Villars, or even Mrs. Mirvan who does act as sort of a parent to Evelina). While they do provide emotional aspects to the novel (concern and care over Evelina’s well being), much of the emotion comes from Evelina’s own perspective (her embarrassment…[Read more]

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    Mo commented on the post, Sentimental Journey and Language, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Sentimental Journey and Language, on the site Origins of the "Novel" The eighteenth century was a time for exploration and travel. Much literature was written within this period which […] View

    While I would like to agree that Chaucer’s tales and this book have a lot in common, as you suggest, I am not entirely convinced. Chaucer’s tales seem to be more about contrasting stories between characters so reveal each character’s true nature; whereas Yorick is really just milling about Europe to buy stuff, judge people, and write. Admittedly,…[Read more]

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    Mo commented on the post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Sentimental Covered by Reason, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Our sentimental Mr.Yorick travels across France, all the way from North to South, gathering random little stories […] View

    I love your map! I thought about doing that myself to see where he traveled, but thankfully don’t have to because you did it! I agree that Yorick does come off as somewhat of a Lothario during his “adventures.” It is interesting that you and Sana concentrated on the sentimental aspect of his personality, especially in regards to women (who seem to…[Read more]

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    Mo commented on the post, Visualizing knowledge in Frankenstein!, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Sentimental Journey 101, on the site Origins of the "Novel" While reading this novel, many questions were in my mind; How sentimental Yorick is? How would he describe Sentimental […] View

    I hadn’t actually considered Yorick to have no sentimental feelings, I just regarded him as an observer of others. And I think you’re right that he notices emotions in other people, while maintaining a healthy distance from other people. The way Sterne writes this appears to me to be an observational guide of people on his journey though. In that…[Read more]

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    Mo wrote a new post, None for you, Monk., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 5 months ago

    Religion is not a main topic of concern of Laurence Sterne in his A Sentimental Journey, it is however, mentioned just often enough to make it a topic of interest. Yorick, Sterne’s main character, begins his t […]

    • Interesting. It is almost as if when creating the novel that audience awareness was a key point for Sterne. With this new emerging readership, it is as if Sterne addresses the concerns of the day, such as religion, politics, economic questions that plagued many individuals at the time. Maybe the language that Yoric uses to describe characters, such as the Monk and other characters, were common feelings toward the themes he discusses among individuals at the time. Maybe, there was a certain awareness of situations which many felt they had to be on guard.

    • I was very curious when I first read about the monk, why was there a monk in 18 century of France? Did he mean a Buddhist monk or other religion?(Are other religions called monks?) Back to the topic, it seems, that Yorick gave the monk something mainly to keep him from telling the fair lady about how rude he was. Perhaps it is also one of the reasons why he became a more generous man- to be known as generous to female.

    • What is the nature of his charity? How does it function, do you think, in the novel? For instance, is Yorick in a position of power vis-a-vis the monk, the woman, and others? What does he get out of the exchange? I think you’re right that religion is evident in the novel (Sterne was a parson and was well-known for his sermons), but what can we do with that general observation? Is it religion that’s at stake here, or a kind of charitable empathy?

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    Mo commented on the post, Virtue Rewarded What?, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Virtue Rewarded What?, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Richardson has made this book reads like a propaganda of a specific religion moral standard, rather than a love story […] View

    I like your feels about this reading! It does seem like a lot of women of this era only have their chastity as a bargaining chip, and are often times not receiving the better half of the deal.

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    Mo commented on the post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    In reply to: Sana wrote a new post, Reading Pamela, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Pamela is a very interesting novel to read especially because it is mainly based on letters. Letters are told in the first person; emotions […] View

    I would agree that Pamela wants to set herself up for an upgrade, marriage wise. But I would have to add to your point that her letters are filtered, because she’s writing to her parents. We should consider that perspective, which I think makes your points about Pamela hiding her feelings all the more interesting. She’s a young woman who cannot…[Read more]

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    Mo wrote a new post, Morally Boring and Mildly Enraging, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    When I first read through the Pamela excerpt I was . . . enraged, flabbergasted, and frustrated with Pamela’s character. Pamela proved herself to be a weak character who could not stand up for herself and a […]

    • I have the same feeling, find the book boring, and hard to agree with the world Richardson tries to form. It’s a weird story indeed, especially with a view of today’s law and society. And I like the idea of “happy medium”, which reminds me about steak. Rarely would people prefer the extreme of “raw Roxana” or “overcooked Pamela”, around medium seems like a more comfortable choice.

    • I can definitely see how a modern reader would find Pamela weak and frustrating; however, don’t forget that this is a story about a young female domestic servant in 18th century England, who is bound to her employer (and a political power, and a wealthy man, and…) in very specific, material ways. In what ways might we see Pamela as strong as well as weak? As both rebellious and conventional? What does the telling of this particular story tell us about power or gender in the 18th century?

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    Mo commented on the post, Blog Post #3, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    In reply to: mnm53290 wrote a new post, Question of Audience, on the site Origins of the "Novel" When reading Roxana, the reader is immediately aware of the significance of audience. We are immediately, sparked pose the […] View

    I agree that the narrator, Roxana, is writing to make herself appear in the best possible light (literally and figuratively). While I accept what you say Bartholomae is saying, most authors are in fact trying to sway their reader in some direction, I do wonder where your evidence is textually? I think your argument would be better served if you…[Read more]

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    Mo commented on the post, The Marrage Law could save countless “whores”, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, The Marrage Law could save countless “whores”, on the site Origins of the "Novel" Amy said that she would rather be a whore than seeing her mistress starve, and suggests her m […] View

    I’m actually confused about the title of your response, how is the law (which you argue against) supposed to save women? Regardless, I do like the direction your post takes. While I don’t agree that Roxana accepting her “whore” title is a sign of mental illness, I do agree that she accepts that title because it provides her with a sense of comfort…[Read more]

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    Mo wrote a new post, You can have your cross, I’ll take the cash., on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    There is a much greater mention of religion in the second half of the novel, than there was in the first (the prayer Amy and Roxana offer up as they toss and turn in the ship to England). We see it first after […]

    • Agree, I don’t feel the impact of religion in Roxana’s decisions either, she had indeed given up the faith in her god. And she refuses to take her child back publicly because it could threat the safety of her fortune. From that I would say, instead of money, she actually knows what else she can do as a mother, but she made a choice not to do it; at last money is the only thing that can make her feel safe, and she decides to secure her treasure at all costs.

    • Her money really does seem to be associated with how she views her moral core; what’s interesting to me, as well, is that Defoe goes to great lengths to make sure we know it’s not money, per se that’s the problem, though, but how she comes by it. For instance, when we are introduced to Robert Clayton, who helps her increase her money greatly and is routinely described as honest; and again, when her last husband, the Dutch Merchant, is laying out all his assets. I wonder, however, about the difference that gender makes–that is, these are both men who could come by their money honestly. Would the Roxana of the first pages have been able to? Would any woman in the 18th century, born into a more middle-class life? What is the difference that gender makes?

    • Love the title, by the way!

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    Mo commented on the post, Dig into the data of Roxana, on the site Origins of the "Novel" 4 years, 6 months ago

    In reply to: Rongling Tang wrote a new post, Dig into the data of Roxana, on the site Origins of the "Novel" I was trying to read this book in the past week, English is my second language, so it is naturally my first time to […] View

    First off, your chart is awesome! I think it’s interesting you see a shift in Roxana’s character after the death of her faux-husband, the Landlord. I saw a shift, or at least a moment of recognition for all that she had done morally, after Amy was unconscious on the ship. What did strike me about when Roxana was in France, was her totally…[Read more]

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