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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Reflection, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 9 months ago

    I wish I had more time this semester and I would have thoroughly enjoyed doing a creative approach to this final project but alas, I stuck with the age old 15 page academic paper. I did change my topic halfway […]

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, “Emphasis on Iago”, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 10 months ago

    By using textual analysis and some discourse analysis I will be comparing Othello to Disney’s Aladdin. Aladdin may not seem an overt adaptation of Othello, as it is set in India and focuses on the “street rat […]

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Female Blackness and a Sense of Self, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 11 months ago

    While Erickson’s article truly explores the issue of race within Harlem Duet, one aspect of the play I found truly compelling is the ability of Sears to create a possibility of healing or at least inclusion, in a […]

    • Lovely response here–I didn’t intend to comment, but I can’t help myself. Great job analyzing the text itself and very polished prose style in your analysis as well.

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Desdemona, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 11 months ago

    While it is true that the male characters never actually appear on stage, their influence resonates in every aspect of the women’s behavior. The majority of the play’s action is driven by the male characters, fro […]

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Double Take: Iago and Emelia, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 11 months ago

    It is interesting to look at the relationship between Emelia and Iago by looking at Scene 9 in Iago and comparing it to Act 3 Scene 3 in Othello. 

    For starters, in Iago the pivotal character Iago is now the m […]

    • Be careful to use page cites for Iago, even as a pdf. That helps locate the specific passages you’re working with. I’m curious, however, that you talk about the characters in Iago just as characters, and not as the metatheatrical references by Woman and Author, for example, in the prior scene. Why does she get to be Emelia in this scene, but “Woman” in other scenes? Do you think that’s related to the parallelism of this scene with Shakespeare’s version? Add the cites and Works Cited, even in these blog posts for both precision and usefulness at the midterm.

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Primary, Secondary, Tertiary Source, OH MY!, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 1 year, 12 months ago

    Y’all, I’m back. Sorry to be MIA for a week but something flu-like this way came.

    Primary sources are super fun to find and work with. I have a LOT of background with this type of research, especially working […]

    • Love the primary sources you found and your analysis, and on a sidebar topic, John Glavin is a very kind man who is Georgetown faculty. You could probably interview him if you liked for a future research paper. My only small comment is that your Works Cited has some erratic format, capitalization and it appear missing information in terms of always letting your reader know where you find the item, whether online, in a special collection, or on a website (and for JSTOR, you don’t need the URL usually in MLA, just JSTOR since as a database it requires membership to access the URL).

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Loose Lips, Sink Ships, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 2 years ago

    “She that was ever fair and never proud,
    Had tongue at will and yet was never loud,
    Never lacked gold and yet went never gay,
    Fled from her wish and yet said “Now I may,”
    She that being angered, her reven […]

    • Ally,
      Really nice use of direct quotes to stitch together both textual analysis and gender analysis. This point in particular is masterfully made: “These examples are ones that he uses against Desdemona later to Othello. He points out her “loose tongue” and her encouraging ways with suitors. He mentions her weakness in character as she is a woman, and a woman who had already disobeyed her father to marry Othello. All of these are strikes against her, as she has not lived up to the ideal of womanhood.” This would be worth discussing more in class–how Iago takes Desdemona’s traits and frames them within specific Early Modern values of femininity to undo her. Similarly, we could look at how she attempts to reframe herself through her own speech, and whether a woman talking in defense of herself is an effective strategy in this play, and perhaps in this era.

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, “Happiness quite unshared can scarcely be called happiness; it has no taste.”, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 2 years ago

    The quote about is by Elizabeth Gaskell, a dear friend to Charlotte Brontë, who subsequently wrote the biography of her. If you cannot tell, I’ll be musing on the chapters regarding biography and the ways that […]

    • Ally,
      I love the connections you are making to outside class and your thesis, but be careful to keep bringing yourself back to this course’s readings as well when possible. This will make these posts more useful when it comes time to review for your midterm exam, for example. Don’t get me wrong–the outside connections are great. Perhaps just alternate them with posts that delve into the readings for our class, or bring it back to a quick bridge between Bronte and Shakespeare, for example (there do seem to be some slippery auto/biography connections here).

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Zounds!, on the site Error 501: Textual Relations 2 years ago

    The readings this week truly resonated with my current position in my academic experience. Since day one of graduate school, I have been performing textual analyses, arguing whether changes in text matters and […]

    • Very nice job tying your observations to specific examples like the various editions of Frankenstein and the Key and Peele Othello riff (which I used in an UG class, and find very appropriate. After all, Shakespeare is utterly profane for his day). You are right that one reason I chose Shakespeare is because of his complete cultural saturation and appropriation, as well as the undetermined nature of his own original texts.

      To address your own examples, the evolution of Shelley thematically from free-will to fate makes sense to me in light of age and loss, but is pretty heart breaking. Of course that raises the question of whether I’m oversimplifying her motives in terms of autobiography, which fits this week’s reading. So we can continue to discuss!

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Final Farewell!, on the site EN571: Literature & Technology 2 years, 5 months ago

    The student research conference was a blast and I really thank everyone for listening and engaging with my project! It was very interesting to see what our fellow students have been working on and it makes me even […]

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Framing Sentiment, on the site EN571: Literature & Technology 2 years, 5 months ago

    Kurt Vonnegut once said when explaining the structures of narratives, “And if I die — God forbid — I would like to go to heaven to ask somebody in charge up there, ‘Hey, what was the good news and what was the bad […]

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Story Sentiment?, on the site EN571: Literature & Technology 2 years, 5 months ago

    Story and plot are seemingly synonymous ideas often used interchangeably in discussions of literature, however, the two are very different aspects of a narrative. Highly debated since Aristotle first coined plot […]

    • It’s always an interesting method to utilize the three (3) story-line such as Walton, Frankenstein, and the Creature, and with this type of research, I feel that it will benefit you indeed. I believe close-reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein might be the simple solution to the problem you mentioned of “where one framework ends and another begins.” I’d like to ask, however, how will you organize these graphs and compare them to each other? Otherwise, I am excited to learn more in how this project will progress as the topic-subject of story and plot are interesting and it seems you have a great understanding of these devices.

    • To address some of the questions you raise in the third paragraph (since I can’t really comment on the technical aspects of your project) – I think as long as you recognize going into the project that the sentiments expressed might not be completely “legitimate” because of the framing, then it can still be factored into your analysis or provided as a disclaimer. This is all the textual evidence that Shelley gives us, so there is really no other way around it. I think a deeper analysis of the difference between plot and story would also be interesting.

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Does Sentiment Drive Success?, on the site EN571: Literature & Technology 2 years, 6 months ago

    Kurt Vonnegut once gave a lecture on storytelling, and explained that there were but six basic plots in literature. With this in mind, I found Matthew Jocker’s Sentiment Analysis R based program, Syuzhet. This p […]

    • Ally,
      What an interesting idea — I can’t wait to see how your project develops! Like Vincent, I am not familiar with Syuzhet, so am hesitant to offer much in terms of guidance with that. My main suggestion, however, would be to try to narrow your focus (this could be a potential thesis topic, perhaps?). One idea might be to limit your project to short stories, rather than novels? Or not trying to look at all six of Vonnegut’s basic plots, and instead identify one or two. That being said, my primary concern is that you haven’t explicitly stated how your project differs from Prof. Jockers. For instance, you could identify that you are building upon his model for the purposes of __ X___, or conversely, that you are differing with his conclusions because of __Y__ (whatever X and Y happen to be), and use your texts as evidence of that. Does that make sense and/or help? Again, I think that this idea has a great deal of potential, but the current scope might make it unwieldy for this our 571 final project.

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    Allyson Freeland wrote a new post, Canon you not?, on the site EN571: Literature & Technology 2 years, 7 months ago

    For my informal discussion, I chose to read Pamphlet 8 of the Literary Lab, “Between Canon and Corpus: Six Perspectives on 20th Century Novels.” I chose this because I am doing my final project on Kurt Von […]