Explorers

Ann Bucklin

Ann Bucklin

Professor
University of Connecticut

Ann Bucklin studies the molecular ecology and evolution of marine zooplankton, with a special focus on crustaceans. Ann’s field of research has been transformed by rapid advances in molecular technologies, and her studies now include comparative genomics and transcriptomics of non-model marine species, as well as molecular analysis of pelagic biodiversity through DNA barcoding and metabarcoding. Her most recently submitted paper describes the exceptional nature of the genome of the Southern Ocean salp. She has participated in oceanographic field campaigns in many ocean basins, and has a special appreciation for the beauty and remaining mysteries of Arctic and Antarctic regions. Ann is currently Professor of Marine Sciences at the University of Connecticut. She earned a PhD in Zoology from the University of California at Berkeley, with postdoctoral studies at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Marine Biological Association of the UK. She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Norway (1992-1993) and was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement for Science (1995). She currently serves on the Science Advisory Board of the Mystic Aquarium (Mystic, CT); the Board of Trustees of the Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science (SAHFOS, Plymouth, UK); and as chair of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Working Group on Integrative Morphological and Molecular Taxonomy (WGIMT).

“The hidden ocean is one of the most amazing experiences”- Fatima

 

Michael Aw

Michael Aw

Photographer
Ocean Geographic Magazine

Michael Aw is an author, explorer, photographer, and conservationist. His accolades include winning more than 65 international awards, including the Wyland ICON Award, and being named as one of the world’s most influential nature photographers by Outdoor Photography. His essays and pictures have been featured in BBC Wildlife, National Geographic, the Smithsonian, Nature, Ocean Geographic, Times, and Nature Focus, to name just a few. Michael has authored 56 books and is the founder of Asian Geographic and Ocean Geographic. The Shark Research Institute recognized Michael with the Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award in 2008 for his campaign against shark fin soup consumption in the Asia Pacific region. In 2015, Michael was the project director for the Elysium Artists for the Arctic expedition with 65 team members, comprising the world’s best image makers and scientists, to document the flora and fauna for a movie and climate change index of the Arctic from Svalbard, Greenland, to Iceland. While on the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, Michael will be shooting still photography and directing a documentary about the expedition.

 

 

Caitlin Bailey

Caitlin Bailey

Web Coordinator
Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration

Caitlin Bailey holds a MFA in Science and Natural History Filmmaking from Montana State University and a B.S. in Animal Biology from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Her background includes fieldwork with sea otters in Alaska, lab research on wild mice vocalizations, research on migratory bird distribution on the Texas coast, and mentoring undergraduate students in biology. She also volunteered with the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network and the Second Chances Wildlife Rehabilitation program at the Texas State Aquarium. In pursuit of her filmmaking career, Caitlin held a writing and film internship at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and worked as a camera operator and stage manager with Montana PBS. Before her current position with The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration, she discovered the amazing world of ocean exploration as a video engineering intern onboard the E/V Nautilus. She has since been to the Mariana Trench onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer and is very excited to be producing both photos and videos of this Arctic expedition to share with the public.

The hidden ocean expedition provides a unique opportunity for adventurers to explore and understand the mysterious sea – the Arctic.

 

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