All posts by Tonya-Marie Howe

Student Research Conference Observations

Last Wednesday we attended the Graduate Student Research Conference at Marymount University. This is actually the first ever research conference that I attended, so it was an entirely new experience for me and I did not know what to expect. Luckily the portion of the conference of which I had attended was related to a topic that has been the theme of our EN 571 course. It was very interesting to see the many different perspectives on Mary Shelley’s Franktenstein. Even though the perspectives presented were different from each other, they were all still similar in a way. They all had a portion discussing the negative nouns associated with the creature in Frankenstein. Each presentation spoke about these negative terms in a different perspective.

What I most enjoyed from those presentations informing the audience about the names in which the creature is referred to, was when my colleague Amy, was presenting her research and created a slide in her powerpoint dedicated entirely to the names associated with the creature. I wished I had taken a picture of that slide. I think that slide is beneficial in serving an introduction to people that are not familiar with Frankenstein since those names in the slide portray the theme and what to expect from the novel. My friend that came with me never encountered this novel before, but from how each presenter spoke about it, I think they each did a great job in introducing what Frankenstein is about. They all touched base on the storyline, the theme, the negativity in it, they were each able to cover the important parts of the novel and made those that are unfamiliar with it, still understand the research, so I applaud all of the presenters.

My favorite presentation by far and the one that I most looked forward to in terms of how it progressed, was Vincent’s creative school assignment on the novel. I think his project progressed positively in a vast way from how it first started, and it is a research project he should be very proud of. It was a presentation that was exciting to hear about, it was not something that you would lose focus in easily because of how engaging his ideas were. The audience was very intrigued to see how these characters would be on social media. I genuinely wish that more high schools would create assignments like this because, in high school, it is difficult to get the students to be engaged or even like a subject that they might be weak in, but when it comes to having them associate this subject with something they use in their daily lives, such as social media, they will have a different outlook on this subject and not dislike it as much. A lot of high school students either have a strong dislike for math or a strong dislike for their English classes. If English classes were to use this interesting spin with one of the assignments, the students will not see English as that bad of a class, since it is no longer boring, they can relate it to their everyday life.

I applaud all my peers that presented at the conference, they all did a great job, especially navigating their ideas to make it fit with the tight time frame. This is an extremely big assignment and they managed to get their ideas out and explain them clearly. All of their projects have transformed into really good outcome and it was fun to just see the final or almost the final outcome of their work. (568)

Original Post

Day Eleven – SRC Reflection

In my presentation, I found to be more confident in myself, the proposal, and the PowerPoint in general which made the experience more relaxed and comfortable; moreover I was able to converse with the audience and their questions/suggestions more loosely yet focused than expected. I felt I had a better understanding and position in my proposal as I gauged the reactions from the audience itself as well. I also felt it was a wise decision to print handouts of the significant documents such as the grading rubric and the assignment proposal for the audience to review upon; I was worried that the PowerPoint was not large in font or overall size for the audience to read off.

I have, however, a repeating habit of stammering or prolonged usage of nonsensical wordings like “uh” or “um” to drag on sentences while in thought. I hope to fix this in the future for next presentations, a possible solution could be making more notes with detail explanations to browse back if necessary. Furthermore, I should also develop my PowerPoint to be more specific and provide more details or examples to illustrate my points; I felt myself diverging away and missed some key elements to my presentation and proposal.

As for the other presentations, they demonstrated the strong points of oral (or vocal) skills that I should strive for in my preceding presentations (formal or informal). Overall, I believe I benefited from this experience and enjoyed myself than expected.

Final Paper Outline

Title: Ready to Escape Reality and Enter the Digital World?

Introduction:

The digital world has always been an intriguing idea. There, one finds a whole new world that is limitless. The topic of this paper is the worldwide phenomenon teen book turned into movie, Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. This novel was turned into a movie by the prominent director, Steven Spielberg recently this month. For this research paper, I would like to discuss what made this book a breakout new trend in today’s society. Today’s society is considered to be a digital society due to our reliance on our technology and social media use. In fact, how I was introduced to this movie was through an advertisement on SnapChat, which then lead me to discover that it was a novel, just through a basic internet search. This is what is so fascinating about the digital world. Digital Worlds hold limitless information, and this is why many believe that in the real world, they do not necessarily fit in, but with the digital world, they can create themselves to fit into that world that they chose to role play in.

An explanation for the introduction: Discussing the topic of the paper, which is the Steven Spielberg movie depiction of the novel, Ready Player One. I will give a brief introduction of it, explain how the book turned into a phenomenon, and the culture that came behind the book, such as the fanbases. I will also explain here how I was introduced to this phenomenon. My thesis is about the emotional appeal of the digital world more than the idea of marketing. This paper will briefly explain the appeal of social marketing but will focus on the emotional appeal of the digital world by mostly focusing on the movie interpretation of the novel Ready Player One.

First Body Paragraph: Explaining a summary of the novel

Second Body Paragraph: Explaining the movie portrayal of the movie and going in depth with it. I chose to focus more on the movie due to how I felt when I watched it. I felt as though this was the best movie to explain how digital ideas such as other famous classical movies have become iconic and are present and referenced in many ways throughout the movie. For instance, when they enter the digital world in the movie, you see references to the movies The Shining, King Kong, and many others. This will be a good transition to my next few paragraphs about, the effect of the digital world, so how it affects the real world and how the real world affects the digital world.

Third Body Paragraph: Explanation of the digital world

Fourth Body Paragraph: How the digital world affects the real world

Fifth Body Paragraph: How the real world affects the digital world

Sixth Body Paragraph: Social media marketing

Seventh Body Paragraph: The emotional appeal of social media

Eights body paragraph: The emotional appeal of the digital world

Conclusion: The idea of escape and its allure which is meant to explain my title.

Original Post

Day Ten – Proposal Outline

Working Thesis:

The thesis for this project-proposal is to examine the creativity of digital humanities and their activities within a school setting. Can digital humanities rely on creativity as much as other English courses and if so, where it the evidence to suggest that in recent years? Why are there seemingly few sources that have the two subjects (digital humanities and creative writing or creativity) in the same source? Could creative writing benefit or negate the progress of digital humanities? This project-proposal will propose an ideal student-activity within a high-school setting, examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources, tools, and pedagogy.

Outline of Proposal-Draft

  • The Topic (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Elaborate on thesis
    = The creativity of digital humanities
    = Propose an ideal student-activity within a high-school setting,
    = Examine Frankenstein as an English subject
    = Utilize digital sources and tools.
  • The Context (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Creativity
    = Definition
    = Dialogue-Script (as example)
    -Digital Humanities
    = Definition
    = Social Media Networks (as example)
    Frankenstein
    = Synopsis/History
    -Student-body
    = Intended Audience (The Why?)
  • The Contribution (1 Paragraph Drafted)
    – Digital Humanities vs Creative Writing
    = Separation
    = Integration
    – Student Engagement
    – Effect of Social Media
  • The Methods (3-4 Paragraphs Drafted)
    – Activity Paper
    – Activity Rubric
    – Demonstration/Example of Activity
  • The Sources
    – Bibliography

Work in progress

In terms of what’s new with my research I decided to change what my initial topic was. I initially started out wanting to do something with the power of the digital world. So I wanted to write about how through the digital world, there is unlimited international access to text interpretations and analysis. I then discovered that I was not that excited about the topic even though I am a person that is very interested in analyzing texts and is always looking for new interpretations on texts.

Up until the day of the conferences, I was seeking for a more interesting topic that still included the power of the digital world. Last Tuesday when I was going through my social media apps, I went on Snapchat and stumbled on a marketing advertisement in the new movie, Ready Player One by Steven Spielberg. What intrigued me to want to the advertisement was that it was using key words which I had already encountered from my last informal presentation on video games and emotional aspects found in the digital world which people have not found in the real world. Once I saw the similar connections I definitely felt interest and excitement towards researching the topic. I generally was going to start with researching about the emotional aspect found in the digital world which will be present in the movie then do a general research on emotions found in the digital world and why the digital world intrigues people. I then noticed this was too broad and I wanted to be more specific. I thought back to how I stumbled across the advertisement and why the advertisement happened and it was purely for marketing and they used social media for it.

This is why the current state of my research project is about how marketing has evolved and for what reasons. I am still looking for more research but the keywords that I am using for my research are: media, mediation, intermedia, immersive, online marketing, relating mattering to the Blair Witch Project, game play, gaming, media ecologies. I am also going to start reading the book Ready player one as well as watch the movie. That is all I currently have for my research. (371)

Original Post

Day Nine – Final Project Draft

The thesis for this project-proposal is to examine the creativity of digital humanities and their activities within a school setting. Do digital humanities rely on creativity as much as other English courses and if so, where is the evidence to suggest that in recent years? Why are there seemingly few sources that have the two subjects (digital humanities and creative writing or creativity) in the same source? Could creative writing benefit or negate the progress of digital humanities? This project-proposal will propose a constructed, ideal class within a high-school setting, examining Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources and tools. Specifically, this class will also utilize creative-writing in most of the assignments for digital humanities such as a group project.

As presented in Battershill and Ross’s academic writing on designing classroom, activities can serve as exploration but require balancing integration and flexibility. As described in their textbook, “creative exploration in classroom activities is nothing new for instructors… the digital humanities offer new compasses and maps for such exploration” (Battershill, Ross, pg. 80). It is essential to be flexible with teaching and learning and thus instructors must find ways to integrate digital humanities (the teaching of digital tools) into a new generation. At the same time, the instructor must find ways to allow this exploration with students and their learning by creating the opportunity to see these old classics (Frankenstein) in a present-age setting and view. I would utilize these examples of classroom activity design (such as ‘character role-play or debate’ for example) but combine elements of creative writing to see how students react and display their results and findings to the classroom. Furthermore, it would be interesting to test the capabilities of the new student body as well as their adaptability with new technology in the digital age. To that end, I’ve come to the theory that activities for digital humanities can begin at the earliest stages before college. I’ve reached the position and idea that speculates that creative writing could be conducted through digital humanities and I would like to examine how such a relationship could benefit the classroom. If proven accurate, these modified digital activities for humanities could benefit the student’s learning of both technical and creative writing.

The contribution of this proposal could provide not only insight on the integration between creative writing and digital humanities, often viewed as two different areas of skill and thought (like fiction and non-fiction) but provide a glimpse of student engagement and the effect of social media of students as well. In recent years, there has been some research suggesting that student engagement has decreased over some time; suggested by Rajaratnam’s Themes and Patterns Explored in the Decline of Student Engagement: An Exploratory Case Study. Naturally, this would be an issue for teachers and students alike in education and the retainment of learning in all levels of schools. If students are detached from their learning environment, it has negative consequences on the student’s long-term future as well as the integrity of those schools. Furthermore, teachers should be supporting students to engage with others as well as their lessons, adding to these negative effects. These teachers are supposed to be mentors as well as supporting role models to their students. Some engagement, however, should be monitored by teachers as well. If left unchecked, students could engage with one another in a manner that could be classified as bullying (cyber or in-person) which should be avoided at all cost. For these reasons, it may prove fruitful for teachers to utilize creativity and engagement in groups while undergoing digital humanities to spark interaction that is safe and positive for all. To require the students to participate in groups creates the opportunity for personal development and create relationship with other group-members. To use creativity, the students create a positive learning experience and environment, and to express themselves to the group and class in an acceptable manner. It can also provide an opportunity for students to explore story-telling (or creative writing) at an earlier age.

If accepted, this proposal would develop a full lesson-plan designed to incorporate the two subjects, digital humanities with creative writing. The thesis of the project would be based upon the idea of creating a syllabus (or rubric of activities) planned out for this ideal class in theory. For the duration of this project, however, the proposal would only examine and record the results of one of the assignments. In this case, I wanted the project to employ a group project into this ideal class, digital activities utilizing creative writing by examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In this group project, I would essentially have groups of two or three high-school students work together in writing a script of dialogue that would serve as a hypothetical addition to the story of Frankenstein; using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or other social networking program. The students would role-play through a message-board or “text-messages” between characters. The characters would be engaged in an argument over being revived from the dead. As such, Victor (or “Victoria”) Frankenstein would be essential and one of the students in the group would have to play the role. A second member of the group would play the “revived” character by Dr. Frankenstein’s hand. The third member of the group could be the supporting character that would assist the group’s argument further. Together, the group would all have to be involved in the formation of the project, argument of the characters, and presentation of their findings and perspectives. As a result, this project would utilize creative writing through the dialogue script, and the project can display basic storytelling by exploring a possible variant of the original story of Frankenstein. The assignment would require using The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein as a template to how to present another perspective of a character other than simply Victor Frankenstein or the Creature for example. This would only be one of the activities that I’d plan and observe, implemented into the syllabus to be used in a real-life high-school English class.

The sources that I’ve chosen for this thesis and proposal are deprived from studies that examine creativity (or creative writing specifically) in academics or examine creativity in part of digital humanities now. I also intend to use common sources of Frankenstein for my main focus for the students while a more recent novel reflecting on a minor character (Elizabeth Frankenstein) as a secondary source called The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. This would allow students to see how a different perspective can affect the understanding of a story as it is being told or otherwise experience from another character (other than Victor Frankenstein or the Creature). There would be referencing studies of digital humanities within the classroom to complete my understanding and develop the thesis as well. Furthermore, those sources of digital humanities in teaching would help develop the project and thus the activity itself. As expected, the activity would use social media networking sources of the student’s choice like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or others

In the next pages, this proposal will showcase the activity as well as the grading rubic for the activity as revised:

 

English 101
Mr. Faiella
ENGL Project
03/30/18

Which Character Would Dr. Frankenstein Revive Next?

Objective:
To understand Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, this assignment will require a group of two or three students to work together and role-play as Victor (or “Victoria”) Frankenstein along with any supporting characters of their choice. It is the present-age, Dr. Frankenstein has revived one of the other characters (Elizabeth, Justine, Henry, etc.) and a discussion is taking place over a social media network (Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, etc.). Consider these questions…

  • Who did you choose and why?
  • What are they saying?
  • What are their reactions?
  • What is the impact on the story?

Instructions:
Each group-member will represent a character in a public discussion over a social media network. Each group will be required to submit their scripts of dialogue to the teacher for approval, only relevant and appropriate language will be used for the project. Once approved, the group will be given until the date of presentation to revise and construct a presentation for the class. You will be graded on several different factors, provided on the grading rubric but it will be in font size of 12’ under Times New Roman of at least five (5) pages for the essay portion.

For optional extra-credit, you may provide visuals to go along with the presentation. For example, you could provide images (or “photos”) with each message or piece of dialogue to illustrate the conversation between characters with in-depth immersion into character. These extra-credits will be judged and administered by the teacher in addition to the final grade.

Schedule:

05/02 – selection of group members; followed by group discussion

05/04 – group discussion; work on script of dialogue

05/09 – submission of script to teacher prior to presentation

05/18 – presentation

05/21 – grades

Please talk to the teacher for any questions or concerns, and enjoy the activity.

 

 

Rubric and Grade Sheet

  Above Average
(25 points)
Slightly Above
(20 points)
Average
(15 points)
Slightly Below
(10 points)
Below Average
(5 – 0 points)
Character Role-Play: Taken the character’s personality completely, Taken the character’s personality with precise examination Taken the character’s personality with moderate emphasis on performance Taken the character’s personality but with little clarity and lacked conviction Taken the character’s personality with little to no understanding of the character
Effect on Frankenstein: Anticipated how the story would change completely by the character’s revival Anticipated how the strong of a change with an interesting, original theory Demonstrated how the story may change partially, taking few aspects into account Demonstrated how the story may change but lacks strong connection or reasoning Guessed little to no change to the story by the character’s revival with no evidence or reasoning
Dialogue: Exchanged with authenticity in speech while improvising present-age language Spoken with authenticity in speech but lacked some improvising or melding Exchanged between characters through lacked in smooth interaction Spoken with minor infractions in character, improperly strung together Little to no effort made into the speech between characters or not approved by teacher
Presentation Engaged with the audience, explained their group project with clarity and distinction Engaged with the audience and explained their group project but left minor details or caused errors Presented in an agreeable manner through lacked some group participation The group had trouble presentation, little to no effort in working together The group made little to no effort in presenting their project, weak communication
Essay:
(common grammar, spelling, vocabulary, page-count, etc.):
Well written, detailed. Exceed the requirements and the least amount of errors Written with strong points. Met the most requirements and a few minor errors A typical explanation. Met the average requirements and some errors Lacking in reasoning. Met the bare minimum requirements with more errors than expected Written with little to no explanation. Met the least number of requirements with numerous errors

 

Name: ________________________

Final Grade: _____ out of 125 points

Comments:

Bibliography

Battershill, Claire, and Ross, Shawna. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical

Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers and Students. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Bissonette, Melissa B. “Teaching the Monster: Frankenstein and Critical Thinking.” College

Literature, vol. 37, no. 3, 2010, pp. 106-0_9, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/742631726?accountid=27975

Dalbello, Marija. “A Genealogy of Digital Humanities.” Journal of Documentation, vol. 67, no.

3, 2011, pp. 480-506, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/864087852?accountid=27975,doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy

mu.wrlc.org/10.1108/00220411111124550

Fan, Lai-Tze. “”Efficient” Creativity and the Residue of the Humanities.” English Studies in

Canada, vol. 40, no. 2, 2014, pp. 19-24, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1658887109?accountid=27975

Freese, Stephanie F. The Relationship between Teacher Caring and Student Engagement in

Academic High School Classes, Hofstra University, Ann Arbor, 1999, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/304505672?accountid=27975

Koehler, Adam. Composition, Creative Writing Studies and the Digital Humanities. Bloomsbury

Academic, 2017.

Macdonald, D.L., Scherf, Kathleen, ed. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. By Mary

Wollstonecraft Shelley. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Editions, 2012.

Matsunaga, Bruce. Romantic Cyber-Engagement Three Digital Humanities Projects in

Romanticism, Arizona State University, Ann Arbor, 2013, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1353391389?accountid=27975

McVey, David. “Why all Writing is Creative Writing.” Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, vol. 45, no. 3, 2008, pp. 289-294, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/210673934?accountid=27975

O’Neill, ,C.E. “Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities.” Choice, vol.

54, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1633, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1915872176?accountid=27975

Rajaratnam, Ravi. Themes and Patterns Explored in the Decline of Student Engagement: An

 

Exploratory Case Study, The University of the Rockies, Ann Arbor, 2018, ProQuest,

 

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/2014465024?accountid=27975

 

Roszak, Theodore. The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Bantam Books, 1996.

 

Siemens, Raymond George, and Susan Schreibman. A Companion to Digital Literary Studies.

 

Wiley-Blackwell, 2013

 

Vanderslice, Stephanie. “Beyond the Tipping Point: Creative Writing Comes of Age.” College

English, vol. 78, no. 6, 2016, pp. 602-613, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1799924542?accountid=27975


Project Proposal – Draft

The Connection Between Digital Humanities and Close Reading

As a literature major, reading and analyzing texts, has become a routine procedure. Of course, when close reading a literary piece of work, a reader always tries to consider how else and what other ways they can further look into the text, and what other scopes they may use, and this is when digital humanities comes in. Personally what I enjoy most about literature is analyzing a text, so I am always looking into considering how other literary scholars view certain words, lines, passages and chapters. I always analyze a text with a limited scope, which is just understanding the text through my own interpretations. Sometimes if this texts was taught in a lecture course, I benefit from the class discussions and experience other ideas and looks on the text. This is also still limited, and I would like to research how digital humanities expands the scope of close reading. When a reader goes to the internet and other forms of social and digital media, they have full unlimited access to all forms of analysis on any text they want. There are fanbases for certain authors dedicated to comparing the author’s life work. There are blog posts on any topic in literature or even how a certain word has different meanings. Of course, delving into the digital humanities, does not only expand the reader towards more interpretations of a literary text. The benefit of the digital world is that it is a worldwide phenomenon. How people close read a piece of work and interpret it, is based on their own cultures and beliefs. How the environment they were raised in affects how they interpret a text, but imagine going into the digital world and not only being exposed to a vast group of people, but be exposed to ideas and interpretation from all societies and cultures. I grew up my entire life, living from society to society, culture to culture, but not everyone gets to have the chance to travel and be exposed to the different lifestyles present in the world. With the digital world, it makes it simple for readers to travel the world and communicate with others in the world. Readers do not necessarily have to communicate with others about the text, they can get to know each other and learn about a country they discovered in a book. I just feel that digital humanities expands knowledge. In my undergraduate career, I was taught that reading allows one to travel into the world of the book when reading, but with digital humanities being involved, the reader not only travels into the world of the book, they have the ability to enter any search topic they want online and enter a world dedicated to the book as well as the topic, perhaps even learn more about the author and about the environment of the text. The digital world is a vast world, but it allows a stronger sense of intimacy between a reader and a literary text, since it allows them to explore more from the text than what they would have explored if they had not used the digital sources when interpreting texts. This is why I would like to research how digital humanities expands the world of close reading and allows for their to be a deeper relationship between the reader and the text.

 

Bibliography

Ciccoricco , David. “The Materialities of Close Reading: 1942, 1959, 2009.” DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: The Materialities of Close Reading: 1942, 1959, 2009, 2012, www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/1/000113/000113.html.
Hicks, Troy. “Actually Achieving Close Reading With Digital Tools.” TeachThought, 11 Jan. 2016, www.teachthought.com/literacy/close-reading-digital-tools/.
Jacqui. “3 Digital Tools to Encourage Close Reading.” Ask a Tech Teacher, 14 May 2015, askatechteacher.com/2015/05/14/3-digital-tools-to-encourage-close-reading/.
Schoenbart, Adam. “Improving Literacy with Technology: Close Reading and Argument with Newsela.” Tech Learning, 8 Apr. 2016, www.techlearning.com/tl-advisor-blog/10571.
Zorfass, Judy. “Using Technology to Support Close Reading.” Read Tech Matters Blog | Power Up What Works, 9 Oct. 2014, powerupwhatworks.org/blog/using-technology-support-close-reading.

Original Post

Day Eight – Final Project Proposal

Creativity in Activities of Digital Humanities

This project will propose a constructed, ideal class within a high-school setting, examining Frankenstein as an English subject and utilize digital sources and tools. Specifically, this class will also utilize creative-writing in most of the assignments for digital humanities such as a final group project.

As presented in Battershill and Ross’s academic writing on designing classroom, activities can serve as exploration but require balancing integration and flexibility. As described in their textbook, “creative exploration in classroom activities is nothing new for instructors… the digital humanities offer new compasses and maps for such exploration” (Battershill, Ross, pg. 80). I would utilize these examples of classroom activity design (such as ‘character role-play or debate’ for example) but combine elements of creative writing to see how students react and display their results and findings to the classroom.

To that end, I’ve come to the theory that activities for digital humanities can begin at the earliest stages before college by using a more common subject of humanities (or English). I’ve reached the position and idea that speculates that creative writing could be conducted through digital humanities and I would like to examine how such a relationship could benefit the classroom. If proven accurate, these modified digital activities for humanities could benefit the student’s learning of both technical and creative writing.

The methodology would be from the syllabus (or sequence of activities) planned out for this ideal class. Primarily, however, I wanted the project to focus on a final group project that would be theorized as the clearest example of my reasoning, digital activities utilizing creative writing by examining Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In this final group project, I would essentially have groups of three or more students work together in writing a “chapter” that would serve as a hypothetical addition to the story of Frankenstein. The assignment would require using The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein as a template to how to present another perspective of a character for example.

The sources that I’ve chosen for this thesis and proposal are deprived from studies that examine creativity (or creative writing specifically) in academics or examine creativity in part of digital humanities now. I also intend to use common sources of Frankenstein for my main focus for the students while a more recent novel reflecting on a minor character (Elizabeth Frankenstein) as a secondary source. There would be referencing studies of digital humanities within the classroom to complete my understanding and develop the thesis as well.

 

Bibliography

Battershill, Claire, and Ross, Shawna. Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical

Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers and Students. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Dalbello, Marija. “A Genealogy of Digital Humanities.” Journal of Documentation, vol. 67, no.

3, 2011, pp. 480-506, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/864087852?accountid=27975,doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy

mu.wrlc.org/10.1108/00220411111124550

Fan, Lai-Tze. “”Efficient” Creativity and the Residue of the Humanities.” English Studies in

Canada, vol. 40, no. 2, 2014, pp. 19-24, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1658887109?accountid=27975.

Macdonald, D.L., Scherf, Kathleen, ed. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. By Mary

Wollstonecraft Shelley. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Editions, 2012.

Mandell, Laura. “William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and

Social Media.” Studies in Romanticism, vol. 53, no. 1, 2014, pp. 133-146, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1549544530?accountid=27975

McVey, David. “Why all Writing is Creative Writing.” Innovations in Education and Teaching

International, vol. 45, no. 3, 2008, pp. 289-294, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/210673934?accountid=27975

O’Neill, ,C.E. “Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities.” Choice, vol.

54, no. 11, 2017, pp. 1633, ProQuest, http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-

proquest-com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1915872176?accountid=27975

Roszak, Theodore. The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Bantam Books, 1996.

 

Vanderslice, Stephanie. “Beyond the Tipping Point: Creative Writing Comes of Age.” College

English, vol. 78, no. 6, 2016, pp. 602-613, ProQuest,

http://proxymu.wrlc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-

com.proxymu.wrlc.org/docview/1799924542?accountid=27975

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Project Proposal

Day Seven – Formal Presentation (Assignment)

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein – Which Character Would Victor Resurrect Next?

For this class assignment, you will be required to take your reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or The Modern Promethus and apply critical thinking designed to implore creativity at the same time. Victor Frankenstein is the only character to have the necessary skill and knowledge to bring the dead back to life regardless of the form and condition. As you may have read the story, you should know that Victor Frankenstein brought the Creature into life and towards the end of the story, almost brings to life a mate for the Creature as well.

The question is: if given the chance, which other character would Victor Frankenstein have brought back to life?

Here are additional questions that you may want to ask yourself to present to the classroom: what specific reason would Victor have to resurrect the chosen character? What significance would that character hold for Victor? How would the story be affected by the revival of this character? Do you foresee positive or negative effect?

You will choose one character from the list below and use Microsoft Word, writing at least five (5) pages, double-spaced with font size of 12’ and Times New Roman. All of these characters were close to Victor Frankenstein (family, friends, mentors, etc.) and have all experienced a tragic death. This assignment will allow you to propose an alternate storyline and explore how these changes with characters could affect the story as a whole to the best of your abilities. You will be graded on the explanation of your choice in characters, the chosen character’s value towards the story of Frankenstein as well as the relationship with Victor Frankenstein, how the chosen character might view this resurrection first-hand, and finally examining your writing to correct any common errors before turning in your essay.

Please enjoy and have fun. Good luck!

Characters:

– Caroline Beaufort

– William Frankenstein

– Justine Moritz

– Henry Clerval

– Elizabeth Lavenza

– Alphonse Frankenstein

Optional:

– Doctor Waldman

Grading Rubric:
Frankenstein – Grading Rubric
PowerPoint Presentation:
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Fictional Worlds in the Digital Age

  1. Fictional Worlds in the Digital Age

essay by Marie-Lauren Ryan, Digital Humanities.ORG

 

What did you pick, and why?

  1. During my undergraduate studies, I was taught that reading served as an escape into a new world, and for my senior seminar class, one of the students wrote her final essay on the creation of fictional worlds and it interested me, so I wanted to look further into the topic.

What is the author’s key or central topic/issue?

  1. Her key and central issue was about the pleasures of literature and how the mind reaches the most fulfillment when immersing in a fictional world.
  2. She states that some works prohibit this pleasure, which are highbrow works, and her argument is that “it is pointless to demystify textual worlds as constructed by language or other types of signs if the imagination were not spontaneously inclined to pretend that these worlds are real”.
  3. She wants to ask in her essay what effect digital media has on the experience of fictional worlds and the practice of fiction.

What is the author arguing or explaining?

  1. In order for there to be a fictional world, the text has to be a fiction since “it invites its users to imagine a world”.
  2. Fiction is like performing the act of “make-believe”. It’s like role-playing in a virtual reality which helps with following the pleasures of literature. To immerse the mind in the fictional world.
  3. She writes her essay mostly on the different ways in which fictional worlds are using digital media to create their world and grow.
    1. The pleasures of world building: she talks about how the internet has allowed for people and fans to create these world with their imagination, thus making it a creative activity. She explains the history of world building and its evolution of time and with new updates occurring within the digital media.
    2. Worlds as playgrounds: She explains how digital media like video games allow the player to impersonate a character and being a part of this evolving fictional world. She explains the French sociologist’s two types of gaming: the paidia and the ludus.
    3. Expandable worlds and worlds out of worlds: she explains how through time, these fictional words have evolved and started to spontaneously network with companies thus connecting the fictional world with the real world but still maintaining its own community in the fictional world. This connection is only a way for the world to expand and make money but still be its own fictional virtual reality.
    4. Living worlds: In this section, she explains the laws of the fictional worlds and how it all depends on the player and their persistence. They all start at the bottom and make their way up through quests or by perhaps buying props that will help them move faster within this virtual world.
    5. She ends her essay by explaining online worlds and how fiction and reality affect them. Reality affects online worlds when networks and shopping for props are involved, but it is still fiction because if a player decides to call it a real world, they are valuing this virtual reality over their own reality.   

What are the “stakes” or importance of this topic/issue?

The importance of this issue is when this world expands, what is it affecting. SO with money and selling stuff, the product only has value if others see it with the same value, but there’s an issue with proving to many that this is not area world since it lacks material existence. (580)

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